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  1. #31
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    That about sums it up although I rarely use my Tojiro ITK bread knife. That's not because it isn't a great knife, either.

  2. #32
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    I was in a similar position about a year ago. I was looking to upgrade from a Global G-2 Chef's knife, found various knife-related forums, and became completely confounded by all the options. I've made three knife purchase, 4 stone purchases, and related other miscellaneous purchases. One of the knives was a Hiromoto AS 240. It's a good, but not great knife IMHO, but I don't quite think it's a great starting knife as it requires extra care because it is a carbon steel core knife and to get full performance out of that knife, you'll have to put time and effort into sharpening.

    IMHO, I would start inexpensively so you don't have buyer's remorse for spending a lot of money on a knife you're not too happy with. Since it sounds like you haven't used carbon knves before, I think you should start with a stainless steel chef's knife. For this, I also think the CarboNext is probably the best choice. While I've never used it, enough reputable people have and it's gotten very good reviews. Given its price, it's one of the best price/performance knives available. Shipping is also very reasonable. A santoku would be redundant; it's another all purpose knife like your chef's knife or gyuto. However, note that it does not come with a good edge, like most knives. Getting a honing rod (or sending it to someone here for an initial sharpening) will be necessary.

    If you happen to use a small knife for paring, then a paring knife is probably something you'll really want to purchase. Unfortunately, I haven't found one yet that I'm really happy with so I can't give you a personal recommendation. A 120 mm petty knife is usable for paring and small tasks. I have a Sakai Takayuki that I would not recommend. There are better options for the price. Since many petty knives are around the same price, you can choose whatever knife interests you without a huge price difference between your choices. However, the Fujiwara petty knives are a good deal at $35 for either the stainless or carbon.

    Several people have recommended a bread knife. If you do cut a lot of bread, sandwiches, etc., a bread knife would be a good addition. However, I wouldn't necessarily invest in a Tojiro ITK bread knife. It's a very good knife - I have one - but you could get close to the same performance with a cheaper alternative such as a Victorinox/Forschner for about $40 less. I've had a Dexter offset bread knife for years before buying the Tojiro. I think I paid $13 years ago. It still does the job. You can use the money you saved to buy a ceramic honing rod, stone or put toward that nice cutting board.

    You definitely can get a nice starter set for about $300, not including shipping. Here's an example:

    Carbonext 240: $128.00 (+ $7.00 shipping)
    Fujiwara 120 petty knives: $35.00 (no additional shipping according to JCK website)
    Forschner 10 1/4 inch Bread Knife: $24.95
    Idahone 10 inch Ceramic Honing Rod: $24.00
    Maple Boardsmith 2x12x18 Board: $102.95

    Total (including shipping costs for CarboNext, Fujiwara and Boardsmith Board): $314.90

    If you purchase a Sani-Tuff board or other board, you can reduce the amount by at least $25. If you take out the bread knife, you've reduced your total by another $25.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  3. #33
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    I agree with johndoughy, except for one small thing. Carter was born in Canada
    I'd go Fujiwara FKM (or carbonext) 210-240 gyuto, and for yourself, a small petty (120-150mm), and a parer for the wife. Bread knives, to me are frivolous purhases. I very rarely use my bread knife, and I eat a lot of bread.
    09/06

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  4. #34

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    Carter, as we know him, was born in Japan. He's a Yoshimoto bladesmith, you know.

    He's here now, that's all that matters to me.

  5. #35
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Those skills are as much a part of MC, as loving hockey is. Don't you know that all Canadians have the ability to make world class knives? Most of us just don't know it yet!
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

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  6. #36
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    Just out of curiosity, do many people have experience of the Zwilling Twin Cermax? This knife keeps popping up and I consider getting it just to see what it is like because spec-wise it looks great but very few people ever talk about it. The 66hrc also appeals to me because I am a pro

  7. #37

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    The larger twin cermax knives have good profiles (200 and 240 gyuto) and are thin (a little over 2 mm above the heel) but the handledesign is an insult. That's why I converted them to wa-handles a while ago. The edge retention of ZDP-189 is extreme, drops to something like 90 percent pretty fast but stays there forever.

  8. #38
    Senior Member goodchef1's Avatar
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    haven't used the cermax, but their Miyabi MC66 uses the same steel with different profile. I wish the handles were a bit larger, but I can attest to ZDP's performance "Top Notch" If you are a pro, then go with this beast, or at least one with this steel.

  9. #39
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    If I'm buying a gift for my dad... I'm thinking CarboNext or Fujiwara. I have a CarboNext so I have a pretty good idea of what I'd be getting (both in terms of the knife and the ootb edge); can someone compare the Fujiwara FKM? (I don't want to go carbon in this line, from all I've read about what happens before the knife 'settles down', though my dad is ok with carbons in principle). I'm curious about any comparisons overall, and ootb (which matters more in this context than it might if I were buying for myself). Also, do you think both these knives can be sharpened ok on Arkansas stones? i.e., my impression is that they're not so hard to as to require waterstones. Let me know if I'm wrong. (Dad has Arks, and has never used waterstones; I'm trying to keep the overall price down).

    So I'm hesitant with the CN because of the OOTB edge and also like the idea of the Fujiwara being even less expensive. But I have never touched a Fujiwara. What say you all?

  10. #40
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    Fuji is dull ootb.. I do not have experience with the CN but the Fuji FKM is pretty easy to sharpen. If you compare both and you have the $$, I'd rather go for the CN anyday.

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