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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkultra View Post
    Won't the fats in the butter absorb most of the aromatics (rosemary and thyme in this case) and not allow them to permeate the meat?

    Wouldn't you be better off adding the rosemary and thyme (plus maybe some garlic cloves and sliced shallots) directly to the pouch sans the butter?
    In essence you are looking to have the finished steak glistening in herby/garlicy/brown butter. If you baste with herbs correctly, they actually fry and become crispy and delicious (especially the rosemary), taking on a whole new flavor, and you can serve the steak with the crispy fried rosemary on top. But obviously you pick that off before the bag because they will get soggy from the meat juices.


  2. #12
    Senior Member spoiledbroth's Avatar
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    Basting doesn't impart flavour into the centre of the meat. Ruins the crust too.

    Cheers.

    Also bkultra I'm confused why would fat prevent the flavour from permeating? It's actually physics that prevents that you should know many flavours (ie odorant compounds) are fat soluble or indeed hydrophilic

    Blue skies over bad lands

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by spoiledbroth View Post
    Basting doesn't impart flavour into the centre of the meat. Ruins the crust too.

    Cheers.
    sorry to disagree but it does not ruin the crust, if it is when you are doing it your butter is not hot enough. And nothing imparts flavor into the center of a steak other than aging. or injection but thats ghetto af

  4. #14
    Senior Member spoiledbroth's Avatar
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    Generally pan basting is a poor technique steeped in dogma. If you are basting something that has been seared imo you are making a grave error. People think it looks cool, but it doesn't provide anything special imo.
    Blue skies over bad lands

  5. #15
    Senior Member spoiledbroth's Avatar
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    And I'm saying imo so often because I'm not trying to be a dick I actually detest the technique. I know some guys swear by it and they usually don't appreciate my spiel
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  6. #16
    Senior Member bkultra's Avatar
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    My point is based around sous vide. If you placed butter in along with the aromatics, the butter would be what absorbs the aromatics. If you left the butter out it would be the meat absorbing the aromatics.

    "Next we move onto the final variable I tested: adding aromatics to the bag. For the sake of this test, those aromatics consisted of three sprigs of thyme, and a sliced garlic clove. In one bag, I placed the steak (seasoned with salt and pepper), thyme, and garlic, while in the second, I placed the same ingredients, along with 2 tablespoons of butter.

    My hope was that as the butter melts, it would pick up all the fat-soluble flavor molecules from the garlic and thyme, helping to distribute their aroma evenly over the meat, and further enhancing its flavor. I also included a single, non-aromaticized steak as a control

    The results were a shock: tasters unanimously picked the non-butter version as the most aromatic. Some even had trouble telling the difference between the buttered version and the version with no aromatics at all!

    How could this be? I looked at sous-vide bags the steaks had been cooking in and had my answer: the bag with the buttered steak contained a large amount of highly aromatic, melted butter. Turns out the butter absorbing the fat-soluble flavor compounds in the aromatics was working against me. Rather than traveling into the meat, where I wanted it to go, it was ending up getting thrown away along with the bag.

    Of course, I could use the melted butter and juices from the bag to make a tasty sauce, but if I'm going to do that, I might as well add butter-less aromatics to the steak bag, and use fresh butter and fresh aromatics for any subsequent sauce to double-up on flavor.

    Conclusion: Aromatics are fine, but leave out the butter if you want to maximize their flavor."

  7. #17
    Senior Member spoiledbroth's Avatar
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    Where does this idea of anything travelling into the meat while it is cooking come from? I'm curious. I've never really seen that happen.

    I have seen people make compressed fruit in a vacuum sealer and they have also flavoured those fruits using the technique of adding so to speak "dry" herbs to the bag to impart flavour. I suspect this may be the mechanism of action responsible for the results above
    Blue skies over bad lands

  8. #18
    Senior Member bkultra's Avatar
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    Compressed watermelon and basil

  9. #19
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    Well TBH I would never SV a steak no matter what, and I don't want to be a douche, but Id say a combined 100 Michelin stars of experience of cooks and chefs I have worked with/for all cook like this, so I am obviously biased.

  10. #20
    Senior Member spoiledbroth's Avatar
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    Cook like what? Basting? ??? But most of the classically advanced benefits of a pan baste have indeed been disproven. Unless you're doing a very quick baste noisette I don't see how you can maintain decent temperature without yielding a beurre noir. What's more butter is not pure butterfat, it is butterfat protein and water emulsified (as much as 20 percent by weight is not butterfat). It is not a very controversial thing to say, water or any moisture, will make quick work of any crust.

    Blue skies over bad lands

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