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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by malexthekid View Post
    Sorry but my logic is based on science not estimates... the only way to stop water boiling at 100C is to either raise the pressure (aka how a pressure cooker works) or to break the water apart (but that again just gives you gases at atmospheric pressure and temp.

    Can I ask what do you think is happening when the butter is bubbling in the pan? That is the water boiling and evaporating.

    Sorry but its science.
    Fat Bubbling and Foaming are different. Bubbling is the water yes, but foaming at high temperatures I think has to do with the small amount of protien stabilizing the expanding fats. If you deep fry enough garlic in a pot of oil eventually it foams like crazy(even after it has been strained), but it does not pop and spit like it would if you dribbled water into it. Also when you low temp oil blanch enough french fries, say at 275, if you remove all the fries the oil is still with little activity, but once you crank it back up to say 375, it has a **** fit and bubbles very loudly untill what I can only think is the starch remaining dormant at the bottom is carbonized. Its a mystery to me.


  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by malexthekid View Post
    Sorry but my logic is based on science not estimates... the only way to stop water boiling at 100C is to either raise the pressure (aka how a pressure cooker works) or to break the water apart (but that again just gives you gases at atmospheric pressure and temp.

    Can I ask what do you think is happening when the butter is bubbling in the pan? That is the water boiling and evaporating.

    Sorry but its science.
    lol. I'm sorry, but this is laughable.

    Ok. Let's break it apart. At 100c, the water is not "gone", that is the temperature of the water we're talking about. What is the temperature of the pot the water is boiling in?

    What the is the temperature of the skillet we are basting in? Probably well above 100 c. However if you add butter to a hot skillet it does not immediately vaporize the entire content of water. In much the same way that once water reaches the "boiling point" it is not immediately all converted to steam. The rate at which this happens is basically unknown any time you're talking about cooking in a casual environment as you must calculate the rate at which heat is given to the water by the heat source (basically getting into fairly advanced thermodynamic calculations at this point). Suffice to say the science of what goes on in a skillet and in particular with a technique like basting a steak with butter is significantly more complex than the picture you're trying to paint.

    I will also reiterate that I am intentionally painting a simplified picture, and not taking into account that boiling point can be affected by suspending the water in an emulsion, having sufficiently impure water, etc. etc.

    Blue skies over bad lands

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by spoiledbroth View Post
    lol. I'm sorry, but this is laughable.

    Ok. Let's break it apart. At 100c, the water is not "gone", that is the temperature of the water we're talking about. What is the temperature of the pot the water is boiling in?

    What the is the temperature of the skillet we are basting in? Probably well above 100 c. However if you add butter to a hot skillet it does not immediately vaporize the entire content of water. In much the same way that once water reaches the "boiling point" it is not immediately all converted to steam. The rate at which this happens is basically unknown any time you're talking about cooking in a casual environment as you must calculate the rate at which heat is given to the water by the heat source (basically getting into fairly advanced thermodynamic calculations at this point). Suffice to say the science of what goes on in a skillet and in particular with a technique like basting a steak with butter is significantly more complex than the picture you're trying to paint.

    I will also reiterate that I am intentionally painting a simplified picture, and not taking into account that boiling point can be affected by suspending the water in an emulsion, having sufficiently impure water, etc. etc.
    Lets agree to disagree, i skipped thermodynamics at uni (joys of being a civil engineer as opposed to a Mech) and yes I am over simplifying things, but so is using a pot of water as your justification. Pour a quater of a cup of water (still far in excess of the water present in the amount of butter we are talking about) and see how quickly that evaporates in a screaming hot skillet.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by malexthekid View Post
    Lets agree to disagree, i skipped thermodynamics at uni (joys of being a civil engineer as opposed to a Mech) and yes I am over simplifying things, but so is using a pot of water as your justification. Pour a quater of a cup of water (still far in excess of the water present in the amount of butter we are talking about) and see how quickly that evaporates in a screaming hot skillet.
    Wait! I had to take thermo to get my civil degree. I think thermo 1&2!

    You didn't, you lucky devil?,

    I just got my SV yesterday. This is a crazy thread.


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