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Thread: What Makes a Good Knife Video?

  1. #11

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    @ ChefNiloc

    I wouldn't do it, but it would work.
    You'd make Bob Kramer look like a slow starter.

  2. #12
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
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    Dubstep soundtrack or GTFO.


    (Kidding!)

  3. #13
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    I think I saw Lefty mention something in another forum about 'board contact shots'. I also think that images/video shots of how an edge makes contact with a cutting board is useful to see blade profile, especially if the shot is backlit well. Hopefully it won't show and overgrind though

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    @ ChefNiloc

    I wouldn't do it, but it would work.
    You'd make Bob Kramer look like a slow starter.

    Ok so it's settled Dave's going to try it when he does his 1st show

  5. #15
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chef Niloc View Post
    Ok so it's settled Dave's going to try it when he does his 1st show
    Now he just has to find twin Rachel Ray look-alikes in swim suits...

    Seriously though, this is a great topic, Karing: I think that you nailed the most important points, but there are a lot of different ways to go about meeting them.

    I think the big thing for me that I see video potentially doing better than photos is conveying a sense of how the knife "feels": how it relates to the hand, how it moves through various types of product and types of cuts.

    I like to come away from a video feeling like I have an idea of what it's like to actually cook with the knife.

    Two of my favorite videos where the knife-centric recipes that Salty did awhile back: the simple ceviche and the seared scallop flower.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin0505 View Post
    Two of my favorite videos where the knife-centric recipes that Salty did awhile back: the simple ceviche and the seared scallop flower.
    I don't think I have seen those videos yet. I'll have to go searching.

    And just to add a bit of realism, a video should also show how effortlessly a knife cuts through your kitchen towels and sponges

    Another video idea that I think would be cool is to do is a sort of vegetable challenge. Just to take a break from the usually onion and tomato video, someone could pick a different veggie/fruit (jicama, ginger root, pineapple, segmenting citrus, peeling apples, etc) and people can cut with whatever knife or technique they want. I think it would be interesting to see cutting techniques with different ingredients, and we might even see a paring knife come out instead if the usual 240 gyuto.

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr drinky View Post
    And just to add a bit of realism, a video should also show how effortlessly a knife cuts through your kitchen towels and sponges

    k.
    So true

  8. #18
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    So Karring, you got me thinking about cutting stuff...

    In my videos I've tried to show a range of different products and type of cuts, but I never really sat down and mode a list of different catagories.

    To start this off, there are the old favorite tricks that Salty popularized:

    Tomato:
    -Push cut (shows sharpness)
    -Thin slice / horizontal hands free slice (shows sharpness and geometry/drag)
    -fast chop (shows sharpness, geometery, speed, contro, edge retention)

    Onion:
    -dice (shows both nimbleness/ geometry of tip/1/4th of blade and general speed & control)

    So what else (besides paper towels & sponges) is worth cutting and in what way/ to illustrate what?

  9. #19
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vertigo View Post
    Dubstep soundtrack or GTFO.


    (Kidding!)
    This.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  10. #20
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    Other than towels and sponges, you can let relatives use your knives and film real world carnage

    For tomatoes, I guess one can also do the cherry tomato drop test along the edge. For onions, one could always scale down and also mince a shallot.

    My favorites are dong a trio of potatoes, then jicama, and then a butternut squash. I find the variety of 'stickiness' and hardness revealing. And I have thought about adding a tomato test in between to test how the edge is holding up.

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

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