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Thread: WIP Honesuki

  1. #21
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    Really cool. I am just curios - what was the motivation for the hollow back?


  2. #22
    Senior Member jessf's Avatar
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    I believe that's what you must do with a single bevel knife. No? I haven't read it anywhere but it makes sense to hollow the backside to ensure you keep even pressure on the leading edge when flattening the back. Essentially the edge and the spine are the only two points of contact when flattening the back. A non-hollow back could run the risk of being sharpened out of true and almost becoming a 95/5 bevel over time. I have read that it helps with food release, but that was entirely not my motivation. I'd be curious to know if you have any single bevel knives that do not have a hollow back.


  3. #23
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    My point was - what was the motivation going with single bevel design for a honesuki and not 95/5 (or 99/1 ow whatever one wants to call it). I could well understand that just simply the challange of making single bevel knife was the motivation, but for honesuki a 95/5 (or something) would be more practical as it gives stronger edge. I am just curios here

    You are right - all single bevel knives (the way this description is used on japanese kitchen knvives) have concave ura side. Once one side would be just flat, it would not be practically possible to de-burr the edge from this side just putting the knife flat on stone and one would need to apply a slight angle and volia - there is 99/1 (or 95/5) knife

  4. #24
    Senior Member jessf's Avatar
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    Ahh. My reason for going with a single bevel was primarily steel selection and the uniqueness of single bevel knives in general. I think D2 lends it self well to a thick knife with a steep edge where hair splitting sharpness isn't the end goal. This lead me to some kind of butcher type knife and I already bought a single bevel Deba which I'm pleased with, so I knew I didn't want another one. The deba is also impractically sharp in my opinion. I don't need to be able dismember a chicken then shave my arm. I liked the shape of a Honesuki and figured a D2 version of it would have a higher chance of success than a D2 laser.

    There's also a considerable amount of ignorance on my part; I don't know what I don't know. I fill the blanks with research and a general inquisitive nature. Never made a knife before of any kind and I haven't done much metal shaping so I wasn't even sure how well my angle grinder would cut the stock material, then I wasn't sure how well I could grind the flats with the tools I had. So, basically, it's a single bevel honesuki because it had to be something and all options posed challenges and unknowns. I come at it with fresh eyes and a "why not" attitude.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    I seem fair enough I have to admit I would not dare to try to make single bevel knife as my first knife

    Just a sude note - D2 is excellent steel for kitchen knives (look at Yoshikane SLD - that is D2 steel). My honesuki from JCK is also D2 (SLD) steel. D2 can actually hold a very accute edge, so if you have the material at hand you should not hesitate to make a gyuto or a petty.

    I would love to hear more about the handle (it looks great) - I am planning to make my first wa handle soon and try to collect as much ideas as possible.

  6. #26
    Senior Member jessf's Avatar
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    I did a WIP wa handle thread for my deba, you might find some info there helpful.
    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...or-165mm-Deba?

    I've got 3 more knives I want to make, a gyuto, nakiri and a version of a single bevel birds beak paring knife, all out of 1084 steel that I can heat treat at home instead of sending out. I'm doing a passaround event amongst my friends with the end result of everyone keeping the knife of their choice. I'll keep the rest of this 1/4" thick D2 stock for making chisels. I would not hesitate to make a knife out of D2 in the future, just thinner stock for sure.


    Quote Originally Posted by Matus View Post
    I seem fair enough I have to admit I would not dare to try to make single bevel knife as my first knife

    Just a sude note - D2 is excellent steel for kitchen knives (look at Yoshikane SLD - that is D2 steel). My honesuki from JCK is also D2 (SLD) steel. D2 can actually hold a very accute edge, so if you have the material at hand you should not hesitate to make a gyuto or a petty.

    I would love to hear more about the handle (it looks great) - I am planning to make my first wa handle soon and try to collect as much ideas as possible.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    That is some really cool WA handle WIP. One quick question - how did you make sure that the single elements stay aligned (as they already were drilled)?

    Indeed - making a gyuto from 1/4" stock would not be too much fun

  8. #28
    Senior Member jessf's Avatar
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    I used a slotted dowel which I neglected to show in the post. At the beginning of my WIP wa handle thread there's a link to Mike Riggen's post on the same topic and it goes into more detail. There are many ways to do it but adding a slotted dowel eliminates a lot of unnecessary cutting after the fact.

  9. #29
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    I see - cool. I will try to make a handle along those lines, just have to figure out how to reasonably slot that dowel as I only have a hand-held saw(s).

  10. #30
    Senior Member jessf's Avatar
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    Handheld saw as in a circular saw or a manual carpenters saw?


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