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? Power or hand tools for saya makeing ? - Page 2
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Thread: ? Power or hand tools for saya makeing ?

  1. #11
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    Chef Niloc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post
    Collin,
    if you want to make a trip to Westchester, I will be happy to show you how I make a saya from start to finish.

    M
    Wow how's that for a invitation, westchester closer then a trip to Dave's, but let me guess Saturday the only day that's good for you?

  2. #12
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    Weekend is fine. PM me and we'll work out a schedule. And bring a few knives along.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post
    Any day. PM me and we worked out a schedule. And bring a few knives along.
    M
    Agggggkkggh always the catch let me guess, a few Burkes, a Kramer or two, sound about rightn maybe I should bring some old vintage tools too??? Like a old 1879 Walker Bros Wood Turning Lathe, right?

  4. #14
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    You will have a hard time moving heavy machinery into my basement shop. My Bridgeport was a huge PITA to move in. I am considering taking over 2nd floor of the building (if I only can figure how to pay for it!), so I can get in some equipment that I can't get into the basement. I could use a metal lathe, a cabinetmaker table saw, a wide-belt sander among others. This is a wish-list, hehe, these machines cost thousands of dollars, but I can't help it - I have a soft spot for American-made vintage equipment - the heavier, the better.

    Yes, Collin, bring knives you think are the best performers.

    BTW, Walker Turner is a brand that needs to be taken very seriously. These machines are practically indestructible, even with little or no maintenance. I just got my hands on 1953 WT drill press. You will that beauty when you come over.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpikeC View Post
    The problem with using an electric router to make the recess for the knife blade is that the recess needs to be tapered in depth to match the grind of the knife. A power router can't do that. If all you want is a big honkin' hole, go with the power tool!
    Its not impossible, nor is it difficult. If you use a tapering jig it is quite doable, though building the jig takes some patience and practice to get it just right. The great thing is that once you've set it up, it shaves a load of time off of your projects. If you haven't seen a tapering jig before, its is basically the same as a router planing jig (which I use for burls or pieces too small to feed safely into my planer) with an incline.

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