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Thread: New stone set (splash-and-go) and new stones

  1. #1

    JBroida's Avatar
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    New stone set (splash-and-go) and new stones

    This stone set came together after a recent trip to Japan. When talking with a stone company we are close with out there, the owner and I got into an in depth discussion about the beginning of his career as a stone maker. When he first started, he began by making magnesia based stones that were entirely splash and go. Since that time, he had moved on to different stone constructions. A little while back, he found a small supply of some older stones he had made. While I was there, I got to play around with them a bit, and even got some to use when I returned to work. I enjoyed using them quite a bit, and it got me thinking, it might be nice to put together a splash-and-go stone set for our customers, as we get quite a few requests for this. Because the supply of these stones (which are not being made anymore) is very limited, this set will not last forever. Also, there was not a coarse stone in the mix, so we are adding our Gesshin 320 Splash-and-Go stone to round out the set.

    This set includes a Gesshin 320, Maido 2000, and Maido 7000 stone. All of the stones are entirely splash-and-go, and require no soaking at all. The 2000 and 7000 stones are on the slightly harder side of things, but still not super hard. All of the stones are fast cutting on all steel types I have tried them on. I've had good results on both single bevel and double bevel knives, as the 7000 stone leaves a decent bit of bite despite its higher grit. The finish from the maido stones is more polished than misty. Because they resist dishing well, they work well for uraoshi sharpening and microbevels. Because of how splash and go they are, they work well for travel and for times and places where soaking stones are just not possible. The Maido stones also include a synthetic nagura, which can be used to clean up the stone surface if it becomes loaded up. The nagura can also be used to refinish the stone surface after flattening if you prefer a more smooth surface. Because the nagura is a different grit from the stone, the stone should be rinsed off after using the nagura.

    CARE AND MAINTENANCE: All of the stones in this set are splash-and-go stones and SHOULD NOT BE SOAKED AT ALL. The 320 is a type of resinoid based stone, but is not ok to soak. The 2000 and 7000 stones are magnesia based stones.To use, just splash a little water on the surface and start sharpening. Splash more water on the stone surface as needed, but avoid submerging the stone in water. It is a good idea to wrap the stone in a damp cloth when drying, as this slows the drying process and can help minimize potential cracking issues in the long run.

    https://www.japaneseknifeimports.com...go-limited-run



    and the individual stones are for sale here too:

    https://www.japaneseknifeimports.com...ne-limited-run

    https://www.japaneseknifeimports.com...ne-limited-run


  2. #2
    Senior Member SolidSnake03's Avatar
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    Interesting stone set, big fan of splash and go stuff myself. How do these compare to the diamond plate set you have? I know it's apples to oranges being stones vs. diamond but wondering about final edge left as well as durability and cutting speed and feel. The usual basically

    For me at least the coarse stone isn't an added benefit as I already have a JNS 300 which is great for coarse work.


  3. #3

    JBroida's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SolidSnake03 View Post
    Interesting stone set, big fan of splash and go stuff myself. How do these compare to the diamond plate set you have? I know it's apples to oranges being stones vs. diamond but wondering about final edge left as well as durability and cutting speed and feel. The usual basically

    For me at least the coarse stone isn't an added benefit as I already have a JNS 300 which is great for coarse work.
    pretty different all in all... similar in terms of the completely splash and go nature of things. I sometimes use my 320 before the diamond 1k. The cutting speed is not as fast as the diamond stones, but they are very slow wearing, and very well may last longer overall. The edge from the maido stones is less toothy than the diamond too, so there's that. I still get a nice crisp edge from the 7k stone though, and the 2k is fine enough to finish on for some knives (softer steel and butchery knives come to mind).

  4. #4
    Matus's Avatar
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    This looks interesting indeed.

    Since the medium grit stone is 2000 grit - it basically begs for the question - how does it compare to the Gesshin 2000?

    Also - in general terms - you have currently 3 Gesshin S&G stones that make for a nice set - 320, 1500, 3000 - what would be the difference(s) to this new S&G stone setup?

  5. #5

    JBroida's Avatar
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    i thought the 320, 1500, 3000 set would be too close in grit for a lot of people to have more mass appeal, although i agree they are awesome and work well in a set. Part of the reason i did this set is that these stones arent being made anymore and its cool to find things that are from a while ago. That being said, these are wider stones than the 320,1500, or 3000 stones we already have, and are a bit less finicky in terms of breaking them in. I actually just went back to the 2000 maido to test it right now so i would have it fresh in my mind. Its not as grippy as the gesshin 2k... its more like if a shapton was a tiny bit softer and had a bit better tactile feedback. And then the 7k extends the range of possible finishes over the 3k. You can still get a pretty toothy edge by using the 2k and just lightly stropping on the 7k. You can also get more refinement by spending more time on the 7k. Because they are very dish resistant, they work well for times you want to do uraoshi or microbevels too. Mostly, it was just something different for fun.

    I really need to start making videos again for stones and knives... i plan to do more of this shortly. We're pretty close to having some time for that. I'm mostly on top of e-mails and near being caught up with sharpening.

  6. #6
    Matus's Avatar
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    Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    I really need to start making videos again for stones and knives... i plan to do more of this shortly. We're pretty close to having some time for that. I'm mostly on top of e-mails and near being caught up with sharpening.
    This just reminded me that I need to keep my Skype on

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    Senior Member SolidSnake03's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info Jon, sounds like a neat set

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    pretty different all in all... similar in terms of the completely splash and go nature of things. I sometimes use my 320 before the diamond 1k. The cutting speed is not as fast as the diamond stones, but they are very slow wearing, and very well may last longer overall. The edge from the maido stones is less toothy than the diamond too, so there's that. I still get a nice crisp edge from the 7k stone though, and the 2k is fine enough to finish on for some knives (softer steel and butchery knives come to mind).
    Can you elaborate on it. I fought that a 2mm dimond plate will never be over.

  10. #10

    JBroida's Avatar
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    I burn through a diamond 1k stone about every 1.5-2 years with daily use


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