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Thread: All things whisk(e)y

  1. #1
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    All things whisk(e)y

    It appears there are quite a few whisk(e)y enthusiasts and drinkers here on KKF, so I thought I'd create a unified thread for all things distilled fermented grain mash. Let's hear about the great, good and not so good, tastings, bottlings, opinions, etc.

    I thought I'd start with an article that suggests the rapid rise in price of Scottish single malts is probably not ending any time soon.

    https://scotchwhisky.com/magazine/la...ateside-march/

    Also, I am going to a tasting this week (Japanese whiskies) and will report back with some thoughts on the world's most hyped spirit.

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    I like this idea, Ive recently started getting into whiskey and would like info from more knowledgeable folks.

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    i met a bourbon guy. cant remember where he works.

    he said that not to over think it. just get what i like. he basically said all of whiskey start off with pretty much the same white booze. bourbon guys call it white dog.

    i've been sipping local sonoma county stuff. very good rye.

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    TTB's guide to "standard"* distillery bottlings (core range) of single malt Scotch Whisky (updated for 2016)

    (*generally the youngest and/or most readily available/most inexpensive offering)

    Glenmorangie 10 year old - Highland - Still one of the starter single malts, in my opinion. A well balanced, lighter Highlander.

    Benromach 10 year old - Speyside - One of the smallest distilleries in Scotland, aiming for a flavour profile found in Speyside whisky from times past with craft presentation (no chill filtering/colourant). An austere, robust Speysider. Highest recommendation, excellent value.

    Old Pulteney 12 year old - Highland - Another lighter highlander with a brine edge. Consistently very good.

    Talisker 10 year old - Island (Skye) - Has returned to form recently in my opinion, one of the best standard bottlings, and a must-try. A robust malt with smoke, a good hit of peat and brine. Peppery arrival is the calling card. You'll either love it or hate it.

    Highland Park 12 year old - Island (Orkney)- Archetypal all-rounder. Perfect second malt. Highland Park on a whole is a victim of it's own success, but this standard bottling is still a reference.

    Springbank 10 year old - Campbeltown - The best standard bottling imo, but certainly not the best starter malt. Far more complex than most core bottlings with a style all of its own. Highest recommendation.

    Clynelish 14 year old - Highland - Also a very individual style, robust with a signature waxiness. Not a starter malt.

    Lagavulin 16 year old - Islay - Another great standard bottling. Great balance of sweetness, sherry, peat, smoke and phenolic character. A must try.

    Laphroaig 10 year old - Islay - Quality on the wane in my experience, but still a very singular character, and one of the most polarising out there. Peat, phenols, salt, medicinal.

    Bunnahabhain 12 year old - Islay - A lighter representative of the Islay style, craft presentation, affordable. A good all-rounder. Recommended.

    Craigellachie 13 year old - Speyside - A new release single malt from a distillery where most of the whisky goes into Dewar's blends. A very unique malt, with unusual spirit sulphur and spicy notes.

    Glenfarclas 10 year old - Highland - A sherried, sweet, thick malt for a standard bottling. Consistently good, a good introduction to sherry cask malts.

    Glendronach 12 year old - Highland - Another heavily sherried entry-level malt. Slightly better than the Glenfarclas imo.

    Ben Nevis 10 year old - Highland - A very singular style from the sparsely populated (in distillery terms) west highland region. Strong wood influence.

    Ardbeg 10 year old - Islay - A very good standard bottling, quality remains high. Sweet peat, smoke and phenols in spades. Often overlooked given the crazy market for old/limited release Ardbegs. Highly recommended.

    Longrow NAS - Campbeltown - Peated malt from Springbank. Very singular, oily style. Recommended.

    Honourable mentions: Balvenie Doublewood, Ledaig 10 year old, AnCnoc 12 year old.

    Yes, there are no Lowland whiskies in there. Mainly because I am not a fan of the standard bottlings. As an aside, the folk at the Auchentoshan distillery are really nice, and (as with any distillery) some of their single casks are gems.


    Scotch Single Malts for Beginners




    Standard bottlings are generally pretty consistent products, vatted to produce a standard/reference flavour profile. If you buy an independent bottling/single cask, it may (and probably will) be a very different animal.

    Non-chill filtered, no colour added, higher strength (usually comes hand in hand with the first two) = better. Often stated, generally true imo.

    Remember that all distilleries can (and will) produce gems and pigs, some produce more of one type than others.

    Older does not equal better, but certainly equals (exponentially) more expensive (although there is growing feeling unscrupulous distilleries are using no-age-statement (NAS) bottlings as vehicles for young, immature malts with inflated price tags).

    NAS malts can be very good.

    Some vatted (blended) malts are fantastic.




    Disclaimer: All of above are the opinions of one man

    TTB

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    Don't care about scotch. But would love to know more about rye's, especially Canadian. Last one I tried was Alberta dark, has depth but way too sweet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by boomchakabowwow View Post
    i met a bourbon guy. cant remember where he works.

    he said that not to over think it. just get what i like. he basically said all of whiskey start off with pretty much the same white booze. bourbon guys call it white dog.

    i've been sipping local sonoma county stuff. very good rye.
    There are a number of complex processes which result in the production of new make spirit (or what some whisky producers term "white dog"). Distillery new makes vary markedly in character due to differences in the grain used/mashbill, type of yeast used, fermentation time and temperature, distillation regime (to name a few contributing factors).

    Drink what you like is very solid advice however...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Timthebeaver View Post
    There are a number of complex processes which result in the production of new make spirit (or what some whisky producers term "white dog"). Distillery new makes vary markedly in character due to differences in the grain used/mashbill, type of yeast used, fermentation time and temperature, distillation regime (to name a few contributing factors).

    Drink what you like is very solid advice however...
    yes..i get it.
    but if you distill it down..(pun) the simple act of distilling is to clean up the alcohol to its most basic and cleanest form..and then you do what you do in barrels.

    i'm not sure if i lined up a bunch of white dog varieties, i could taste any difference. my palatte is not that sophisticated.

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    and i gotten away from Scotch.

    i just like american bourbons. if i could i would road trip to kentucky.

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    Quote Originally Posted by panda View Post
    Don't care about scotch. But would love to know more about rye's, especially Canadian. Last one I tried was Alberta dark, has depth but way too sweet.

    i was told most canadian whiskey were rye.

  10. #10
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    There really is only one true pot stilled Irish Whisky "Red Breast"

    https://www.thewhiskyexchange.com/p/...st-12-year-old
    One thing you can give and still keep...is your word.

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