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Thread: Norton 8000 stone

  1. #1

    Norton 8000 stone

    Hi

    Due to having store credit on a defective pan i ended up with a Norton 8000 stone, my intent was to use this after my king stones as a final polish. On further inspection the stone looks to rough to be a finishing stone, is this just my lack of knowledge ? and will things be fine if i use it ?

    Obviously once use i cant return it.

    Thanks

    Alan

  2. #2
    you have to lap it, they are very nice stones and can put a very fine edge.

  3. #3
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    Nortons aren't too loved around here, but I have 4, and really like how they feel. They are really fast cutters. The 4000 grit Norton feels better than any other stone I have ever tried. It doesn't clog or dish too much, either. The 8000 is nice, but if you want a mirror polish, maybe jump to a Shapton glass 16...it's reasonably priced for such a high grit stone.
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

  4. #4
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    I have a few Nortons. I don't use them much but they are perfectly serviceable, including the 8k.

  5. #5
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    Yes, the 8k is a good stone, but I would say it performs more like a 4k as far as poilsh goes. My Norton 4k seems to cut faster than my Arashiyama 1k and even my king Hyper 1k.... Nortons are gritty.
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

  6. #6
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    I like norton's water stones, oil stones too. I'll likely get made fun of for bringing this up again but I still love the good old feel of a Arkansas stone. Think it reminds me of my dad showing me how to use a stone? They might be slower then water stones but they do produce a great edge, no one gives them any credit around here

  7. #7
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    +1
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  8. #8
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    I think the reasons you all love them are some of the same others don't consider them.... Norton is a classic name when it comes to sharpening chisels, axes, razors, etc.... I guess some wouldn't believe they can make a product that would excel at sharpening Japanese knives. I too, have found other stones that I may like more in each grit, but the consistency from the 220-1000-4000-8000 with the Nortons is a perfect progression (although, I would add an even higher finishing stone for those seeking a true mirror), with the 4000 being the stand out to me.
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

  9. #9
    I've been meaning to check out an Arkansas for cheap steel, because I've only avoided them because they are slow cutters, and I'm a busy man. I like the idea of them though. American hones.

  10. #10
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    Arky stones cut well if you approach them right. They are really sensitive to the lubricant that you use. If your honing oil is too thick or too thin they will not work that well. I use WD40 and get pretty good results. When doing a quick touchup I will sometimes use a fine DMT followed by a black hard. I have a translucent one that puts a really high polish on an edge, and works really well for straights.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

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