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Thread: Cutting board use

  1. #1
    Senior Member Keith Neal's Avatar
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    Cutting board use

    I have seen rules that say not to use a wooden cutting board for meat or fish. Is that government over-protection for public eating places, or is that a rule that is important in the home kitchen?

    Will the "board butter" used to treat my Boardsmith board flavor meat or fish if I do use it for such? In particular, will it spoil the delicate flavor of sashimi?

    I appreciate the expert advice provided here, and will do what y'all recommend.

    Thanks for your help,

    Keith
    If you reach the age of 60 without becoming a curmudgeon, you haven't been paying attention.

  2. #2
    That is a weird Gov. policy for pubic food prep in some arias. I've seen other studies that say the natural properties of wood help control unwanted bacteria. Just be sure to keep raw flesh separate from raw fruit/veg between washings. If you want to be extra safe you can have a veg board, poultry board, and general meat or fish board. As far as the board butter goes I don't know the ingredient list, but he is a quality maker and if he recommends it I'm sure its fine.

  3. #3
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    That's a good question. Similar topics have come up, but never whether or not the butter will flavor your product or not.
    I use the same stuff, just not made by David and I haven't noticed any transference to my food. If you let it dry for long enough, and really buff it off, you won't have any sort of detectable buildup on the surface of you board.
    I'd say, make sure you wipe it all off when you buff/rub it in and you should be fine.
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  4. #4
    Board butter is a mix of mineral oil and bees wax afaik. It's easy to make something like that yourself.
    A dedicated board for raw meats (esp. poultry) is always a good idea even if it's thin poly to sit on your good block.

  5. #5
    My board wax is walnut oil and bees wax so there are different formulas, some use food grade flaxseed oil that they boil until siccative and add the wax. All are good food safe products.

  6. #6
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    I've found that when cutting proteins that cause juice/ blood to pool/ run, plastics are hard to just wipe clean. You have to basically scrub and wash them to remove it. When cutting a rare'ish steak, for example, on a wood board, all thats needed is a quick swipe of a sanitizer soaked towel and its back to business....and at the end of every shift, I wash it, dry it, and wipe it with mineral oil...next shift I wipe it down good with a dry towel to remove any excess oil.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Keith Neal's Avatar
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    Thanks for the answers. That is what I was hoping to hear.

    What do you prefer for a cutting board sanitizer?
    If you reach the age of 60 without becoming a curmudgeon, you haven't been paying attention.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Neal View Post
    Thanks for the answers. That is what I was hoping to hear.

    What do you prefer for a cutting board sanitizer?
    That's another good question. I know that you're not supposed to use anything like regualar dishsoap or that's made with lipids or pastics (just like you're not supposed to uses them on coffee equipment) because the wax and lipids in the soap will bind with the oils and resin and give it a plasticy smell and taste.

    I use a water / vinegar mix in a spray bottle(makes me want salt n' vinegar chips when I use it, but dries odor-free) for most of my kitchen surface cleaning. Bleach water for synthetic boards, but not wood.

    However, I've found that even the mild vinegar water really removes the "good" oil and wax from my wood board too.

  9. #9
    Senior Member rulesnut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwhite View Post
    My board wax is walnut oil and bees wax ...
    Walnut oil will get rancid and start to smell bad.

  10. #10
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    From another web site:

    "Not completely true. Walnut cooking oil will not harden into a film - like any other cooking oil.

    Polymerized walnut oil will harden into a film just like tung oil or any other polyermized oil. I use polymerized walnut oil on cutting boards. You need to flood the surface and continue applying the oil over a 20-30 minute period and then wipe off the excess.

    The oil will penetrate the surface and then harden at the final depth it has penetrated. Like any other polymerized oil, this forms the base for the subsequent coats.

    Reapply the same way another 2-3 times with at least 1-day between applications and you will have a nicely sealed surface.

    You can wipe the surface with soap and water to clean it, and then just follow up with another light coat of oil."
    Spike C
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