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Thread: Cutting board use

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by SpikeC View Post
    From another web site:

    "Not completely true. Walnut cooking oil will not harden into a film - like any other cooking oil.

    Polymerized walnut oil will harden into a film just like tung oil or any other polyermized oil. I use polymerized walnut oil on cutting boards. You need to flood the surface and continue applying the oil over a 20-30 minute period and then wipe off the excess.

    The oil will penetrate the surface and then harden at the final depth it has penetrated. Like any other polymerized oil, this forms the base for the subsequent coats.

    Reapply the same way another 2-3 times with at least 1-day between applications and you will have a nicely sealed surface.

    You can wipe the surface with soap and water to clean it, and then just follow up with another light coat of oil."
    Yep the oil is rendered siccative and does not go rancid after the boiling process. It does not have driers or other additives that would make it unsafe. It is a drying oil that is certified food safe for direct food contact and is intended for use on wooden prep boards, salad bowls, and wooden utensils.

  2. #12
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    Probably not the correct answer, but I just use the sani solution from the packets for red sani buckets.... may not be best for wood board, but definitely safest for food. But, I do oil almost nightly....
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
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  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by NO ChoP! View Post
    Probably not the correct answer, but I just use the sani solution from the packets for red sani buckets.... may not be best for wood board, but definitely safest for food. But, I do oil almost nightly....
    They certainly sterilize. Those things kill HIV.

    Dave Smith recommends vinegar and water in a 1:1 ratio, in addition to some kind of light bleach solution. Also, you can coat the board in salt overnight if you have an especially messy day and are feeling paranoid. I say let it get some sun sometimes. Sunlight is an underrated disinfectant.

  4. #14
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
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    +1 on salting it overnight. That's become weekly SOP for me, more often after a dinner party when I'm really cooking.

  5. #15

    ecchef's Avatar
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    +1 for salting. Iodized salt. Quat sanitizer for overnight soaks on SaniTuff boards.
    My J cooks swear by alcohol in a spray bottle. Passes health inspections, so what the hell.
    Though I could not caution all I still might warn a few; Don't raise your hand to raise no flag atop no ship of fools. - Robert Hunter

  6. #16
    I have some thoughts regarding cleaning and sanitation. All of the methods Ive read above are effective and useful, but they may not all be right for every board or individual. An alcohol wipe can be effective but if you use a board maintenance product that contains beeswax you will end up dewaxing the board every cleaning, alcohol will also act as a solvent for many oils. If you oil with mineral oil after every cleaning and use no other products that could be a good choice as it is non drying any way. If you use food grade siccative oils and or waxes salting followed by a dilute bleach solution about 1TBS per gallon will kill any baddies your likely to come across. On my boards at home I typically just ring out the dish rag from the sink for hand washables, which has an antibacterial dish soap in it, wash the board and rinse/dry. I oil or wax as it appears nessicary. If doing prep for a sausage making session, or breaking down a mess of chickens for BBQ I'll do the salt and bleach.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by SpikeC View Post
    From another web site:

    "Not completely true. Walnut cooking oil will not harden into a film - like any other cooking oil.

    Polymerized walnut oil will harden into a film just like tung oil or any other polyermized oil. I use polymerized walnut oil on cutting boards. You need to flood the surface and continue applying the oil over a 20-30 minute period and then wipe off the excess.

    The oil will penetrate the surface and then harden at the final depth it has penetrated. Like any other polymerized oil, this forms the base for the subsequent coats.

    Reapply the same way another 2-3 times with at least 1-day between applications and you will have a nicely sealed surface.

    You can wipe the surface with soap and water to clean it, and then just follow up with another light coat of oil."
    I don't use mineral oil because I'm worried walnut oil will go rancid, I use mineral oil because it's about 10 times cheaper.

    --

    When it comes to sanitizing a board for home use, I really just wipe it clean. The anti-bacterial properties of wooden boards that people talk about is really just that things need moisture and oxygen to grow on your board, so if it's really, really dry you should be good. Oiling is a maintenance thing for the board, not a sanitary one.

    That said, if I'm doing chicken or something and I know there's more use for the board coming for the same meal, I'll use a different board for it.

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