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Thread: What to do with chard?

  1. #11
    Chard may be a dark leafy green, but it's doesn't tolerate heavy braising as well as kale, turnip, mustard, so saute>braise.

    It'll be getting cold soon enough so soups?...beans ham chard...potato and chard...chicken, ginger, kombu, chard...

    Also +1 for Jon, but find a vinegar you like and add some...helps hide how much butter you add.

    Wild rice, chard, longaniza?, parm, chanterelle, stuffed pumpkin...soft boiled egg

    Been at the sushi bar too long I think i forgot how other people cook.

  2. #12

    ecchef's Avatar
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    Ravioli.
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  3. #13
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    I like to add chard to potato soup, or cannellini bean soup.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    that looks really interesting

    this is not quite on the same level, but its the place i go to when i'm looking for food like that and its walking distance from the store
    +1 Larry's is great. I totally expected to pay a lot more for what I got.

  5. #15
    Senior Member wenus2's Avatar
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    I love chard. I generally do mine sauteed with a couple Tbsp evoo (or sometimes butter) and a few cloves of garlic. Sometimes I add a little bit of good red wine (or balsamic) vinegar at the end and I always top it with a healthy amount of black pepper.

    Since you are lucky enough to have control of the harvesting of the chard, I like to pick the leaves when they are just 4-8 inches tall (cut the stems low). The leaves are nice and tender at this size and the stalks may be left on as they are still quite thin. Also the plant grows very quickly so you can get many more meals out of your growing season this way. Instead of waiting for some giant leaves to form and toughen up, you get to eat the good tender stuff a half a dozen times.
    -Enjoy the ride. *** All statements made herein are my personal opinion and nothing more, regardless of tone or context. ***

  6. #16
    Senior Member Ratton's Avatar
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    Cool

    I like to keep it simple, just boil/steam in some lightly salted water for 2-3 minutes then add some salt and pepper with some butter; just like I would cook spinach. I only cook my spinach about 1 1/2 - 2 minutes. Remove the stems as they are tough and if you cook it long enough for the stems to get tender then the leaves are mush!!

  7. #17
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    Chef Niloc's Avatar
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    I make it kind of like creamed spinach

    Blanch and shock chard

    Sauté onion, garlic, and shallots in butter
    Deglaze with brandy
    Add chard
    Add heavy cream and gruyere and parmesan cheese
    Salt pepper and fresh chopped dill

  8. #18
    Wow--such great ideas! I might have to start with Chef Niloc's suggestion since it reminded me there's a nice big hunk of gruyere in the house that hasn't been put to use in a while, so this will take care of two things at once! Bacon next time!

    Quote Originally Posted by wenus2 View Post
    Since you are lucky enough to have control of the harvesting of the chard, I like to pick the leaves when they are just 4-8 inches tall (cut the stems low). The leaves are nice and tender at this size and the stalks may be left on as they are still quite thin. Also the plant grows very quickly so you can get many more meals out of your growing season this way. Instead of waiting for some giant leaves to form and toughen up, you get to eat the good tender stuff a half a dozen times.
    I will definitely pass this info along; my fiancée does the growing while I do the cooking, so this is good to know!
    - Erik

  9. #19
    Great for Japanese style fish packets in the oven.

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