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Thread: Convex Edges

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    Convex Edges

    As the title says, this is about convex edges. I have heard that it prevents food from sticking to your blade but how exactly do you achieve a convex edge when sharpening? Now I can sharpen well enough and do so often enough to say that I can get my edges shaving sharp but it kinda bugs me when food sticks to my knife.

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    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    In my experience, I got a nice convex edge by thinning my JCK KV8, I made a thread about it. That was my first time and it worked out better than I could possibly have hoped, that was over a month ago and the knife it still very sharp and cuts very well. I'd say it almost cuts better than all my more expensive knives. As you say, it means very little sticks to the blade, just like Salty's video. If you wanna do it less radically, perhaps just sharpen further up the blade a little and kinda rotate it intentionally? Here is a thread at FF which might help you

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    A convex edge bevel won't keep food from sticking. This is addressed by a convex bevel on the face of the blade, and is a lot larger. It's a bit of a debated topic, but it's been shown to work, at least to some extent.

    Convexity in an edge bevel is attainable 2 ways--either by sharpening on a soft-backed abrasive, or....by sharpening by hand. All hand sharpening produces a tiny amount of convexity on the edge bevels. You can get a dead-flat bevel on the edge by using a jig, but a flat bevel provides no advantage. Neither edge bevel helps with food sticking.

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    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    But, a convex edge does help with edge retention, right? Since there is more metal behind the point of the edge, I would assume.
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    Quote Originally Posted by NO ChoP! View Post
    But, a convex edge does help with edge retention, right? Since there is more metal behind the point of the edge, I would assume.
    To some extent depending on the type of damage your edge tends to take. If the damage is mainly due to wear, a convex edge will dull faster. If the damage is due to deformation or cracking/chipping, it will certainly help. As for sticking, Eamon has it right. Release is due to a curvature in the face of the blade. More curvature = less sticking BUT it also = thicker blade or more asymmetric. You can't have your cake and eat it, too. Or was it, "There's not such thing as a free lunch."?

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    You can convex edges too by applying different pressure on parts of the blade my man, think of it as bending the knife a bit and also by wiggling the knife at the same time. I find the best way to do this without messing your cutting edge up is making a strong hefty bevel and then thinning it out while you convex the blade. This is really hard to make on a laser so A types and heftier blades that come unsharpened work best since you have more metal to manipulate.

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    Ya, I agree with that last part, if you have a thick bladed knife the easiest way to get it sharp without having to remove a lot of metal is by convexing it.

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    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    Yeah I agree with you memorael about it being easier with thicker blades. I'm gonna thin my Hattori FH some time soon whenever I stop being lazy. On my KV8 I think I went a bit further than I had planned but the performance increase was huge, there is no visible bevel on it now, it is totally blended into the face

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