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Thread: Convex Edges

  1. #21
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    I just thinned and convexed the right side of my Suisin HC gyuto. I convexed from about midway up the blade to the edge and finished with a micro bevel. Only diced a bunch of onions so far, it fell through them with little effort. When I get better at the technique, my Akifusa will have a date with the stones. Thanks for posting that Carter video!

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by MadMel View Post
    Hmm so it does not help too much with the food sticking problem then. But basically, what are the pros and cons of it? I've read through the posts and it seems that mostly it is down to thinning and personal preference?

    The edge and blade face should be thought of differently. If you convex the edge of a thin kitchen knife then the performance drops because the edge thickens and becomes a wedge but if you convex the blade face the performance goes up from less wedging and surface sticking.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    Yeah, I'm not sure why you'd put slack in your belt anyway. There's usually enough give on mine if I just move the platen back a bit. I suppose with enough slack, your knife would just be very thick behind the edge. In that case, it seems like you wouldn't want to flatten, you'd want to thin behind the edge is all.
    Slack belting is just using the belt without a platen holding it in place. So if you move your platen back, you're slackbelting.

    Murray doesn't do a lot of bevel grinding on a belt grinder, he has a gigantor water wheel, so his methods are more rustic. You can totally convex a blade face by cutting in a few careful bevels on a platen, and GENTLY slackbelting it...you do have to be careful, you can overgrind the edge portion very quickly like this(not that you can't on a 1k stone).

  4. #24
    Senior Member shankster's Avatar
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    Noob question..Is a convex edge well suited for all blade types(gyuto,santoku,honesuki,boner etc)?

    PK

  5. #25
    No. Nothing is well-suited for every blade type, except even grinding and good heat treat.

  6. #26
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    I think this has got to be one of the most helpful sharpening videos I have ever viewed, and of course especially as it pertains to convex sharpening. There is one other I found which was very helpful but the man spoke very poor english. His sharpening skills were awesome and I got the general idea but seeing this with clearer english, my problem not the japanese man's problem, and with the drawings is massively helpful. I am doing this right now with my moritaka cleaver. The one disadvantage I see happening over time...like years and years of sharpening...is that eventually I am going to wear into the kuro-uchi finish to keep convexing the edge, and really have trouble with oxidizing food. Luckily I have found that Moritakas iron will take an ok patina simply through use, cleaning and allowing it to sit out in the air and not covering it up or putting it into a paper saya. Thanks for posting this video johnnychance. It has taken hours and hours of sharpening. I would have loved to have posted a WIP progress type post with pictures so that others could learn from my mistakes and hopefully my sort of ok execution with this as I had lots of trouble finding anyting on the internet that explained it as clearly as this video did.

  7. #27
    Senior Member chefofthefuture's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-rat View Post
    The one disadvantage I see happening over time...like years and years of sharpening...is that eventually I am going to wear into the kuro-uchi finish to keep convexing the edge, and really have trouble with oxidizing food.
    That's probably the one big disadvantage with any clad knife, you're basically stuck sharpening the primary edge bevel and can only really thin the knife a few times. You can understand why many people on this forum prefer mono-steel or unclad knives.

  8. #28
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    Right makes sense. Maybe I should have gotten the masamoto Gyuto instead of the mizuno...I guess time will tell in a pro environment how long that $370 lasts!!

  9. #29
    Senior Member Citizen Snips's Avatar
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    g-rat - dont worry, ive had that hiromoto for years and you know how often i sharpen. its getting to the point where it doesn't have much life left unless i thin it out. im not planning on thinning it as my wife is going for her first wa-handled carbon knives (im very nervous and excited for her) so we will probably just use it as our home knife and give the 5stars to my brother in law. back on track, i wouldn't worry about it. it will be a great cutter and although it will take some time and patience a few years down the road, you can thin it and keep it going. for that knife, you can spend the time on it but for something like the hiro if i wanted to keep using it, i would just buy a new one

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