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  1. #11

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    good luck on the interview, but i would tone down the knife selection. you don't want to come off as a knife snob. bring the duck foot, leave the tongs. peelers help. If you are just doing a tasting with only a couple hours to prep and present, go balls out with your equipment and show off a little. But be prepared to explain how the dish would work for the particular job, its easy to make 2 or 3 plates once, but to do the same dish for 100 -200 every night is a different story. if you are trailing for a shift tone it down and use their equipment. you want to show them you can adapt and work with them... it sucks to have to train the new guy, so try to pick it up quick and make it seem like you've worked there for years.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    Gyuoto, sugi, parer. Really all you need on a practical.

    Most practicals I give I'll have someone finely chop herbs, julienne onion, dice onion, battonet carrot, brunoise tomato, use a mandoline for potatoes, make an emulsified vinaigrette or beurre blanc. Just simple things like that which will give me a good idea of their skill set with knives/tools in general.

    While we're on the subject, can you guys think of some other things which would be good tasks to add to this list. I know there's a ton of stuff I'm forgetting that I usually have em do as well.
    I make them break down fish and a chicken. i like to see what they do with the waste. Stock or fumet or jus... i like to see where there head is at.

  3. #13

    JohnnyChance's Avatar
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    I was trailing for a shift, but I was told to bring my own knives. I just did some prep work and watched them cook on the line. I ended up leaving the tongs in my car, but they arent tong snobs, everyone on the line uses them. So I went in with the gyuto, suji, parer, fish spat, spoons, tweezers, nail brush, sharpies, ceramic rod and honesuki. I had room in my roll so I added the rod and honesuki, which I added so I had something between 90mm and 270mm. All I ended up using was the gyuto, spoons, and sharpie. Turns out I used to work with the Chef for a couple months about 6 years ago or so when we were both garde manger/line cooks. I am kinda over qualified for the job, so he has to sit down with his bosses and see if he can afford me, haha.

  4. #14
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    SpikeC's Avatar
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    Sounds promising!
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  5. #15
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chefjbs View Post
    I make them break down fish and a chicken. i like to see what they do with the waste. Stock or fumet or jus... i like to see where there head is at.
    Chicken, yes. Fish may be a little more costly unless they absolutely know what they are doing. Only one way to find out.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    Chicken, yes. Fish may be a little more costly unless they absolutely know what they are doing. Only one way to find out.
    Yeah usually just get a whole branzinni or arctic char (nothing too price or large) and see what happens... It really stinks to see them for get to scale the fish or forget about the pin bones.

  7. #17
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    That's true those are pretty cheap. I guess cutting fish is sort of the holy grail around my place. Only the top dogs get to really play with the fishies. That's when you know you've made it.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

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