Quantcast
Help - I HATE my omelet pan- the steel pan thread - Page 2
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 13 FirstFirst 123412 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 126

Thread: Help - I HATE my omelet pan- the steel pan thread

  1. #11
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,090
    The temptation is to use butter, but it's jake at high heat so temper it with some cooking oil. Heat the pan until it's got that rippling shimmer, but the water in the butter isn't popping yet. It's a tricky sweet spot.

    If the heat is too low, then you're gonna get some stick. Most proteins do this, that's why we preheat pans before putting steaks in 'em. But if it's crazy-balls hot, when you put the eggs in, the water contained inside is gonna just explode, which is also gonna give you some stick. Ideally, you want that moisture to make the eggs "puff up" but retain their protein structure, giving you bubbly eggs that are, really, just shallow frying on a layer of fat. Like Citizen said, it takes a good deal of practice to really nail it. Start to finish, your omelet should take about 15 seconds.

    I use cast iron and carbon pans for almost everything, and could probably fire off an omelet on a piece of aluminum siding if I had to, but I still keep a cheap non-stick pan in the house for eggs. It just makes life easier.

  2. #12
    The De Buyer Force Blue crepe pan is a nice introduction to carbon steel. Easy to season and maintain. However if you want to use the jerking method of cooking an omelette the crepe pan is a bit low on the rim. For that method any of the other regular carbon steel pans would be a better fit.

  3. #13
    StephanFowler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Acworth, Ga
    Posts
    168
    Quote Originally Posted by Vertigo View Post
    The temptation is to use butter, but it's jake at high heat so temper it with some cooking oil. Heat the pan until it's got that rippling shimmer, but the water in the butter isn't popping yet. It's a tricky sweet spot.

    If the heat is too low, then you're gonna get some stick. Most proteins do this, that's why we preheat pans before putting steaks in 'em. But if it's crazy-balls hot, when you put the eggs in, the water contained inside is gonna just explode, which is also gonna give you some stick. Ideally, you want that moisture to make the eggs "puff up" but retain their protein structure, giving you bubbly eggs that are, really, just shallow frying on a layer of fat. Like Citizen said, it takes a good deal of practice to really nail it. Start to finish, your omelet should take about 15 seconds.

    I use cast iron and carbon pans for almost everything, and could probably fire off an omelet on a piece of aluminum siding if I had to, but I still keep a cheap non-stick pan in the house for eggs. It just makes life easier.
    sweet, sounds like some practice is in order.

    I really appreciate all the help (I do have an unfortunate tendency to go with crazy-balls hot)

  4. #14
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    4,227
    I make my omelettes in stainless. I preheat the pan close to smoking, add a little oil, dump the egg base in and then anything else I want to stuff in it (I generally precook things like mushroom and onions.), once it browns, I turn the heat down a bit and let it cook through some before I fold it over. The only time I have any problems is if cheese gets stuck to the pan.

  5. #15
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,090
    Quote Originally Posted by StephanFowler View Post
    sweet, sounds like some practice is in order.

    I really appreciate all the help (I do have an unfortunate tendency to go with crazy-balls hot)
    Wait, I got more!

    Since it's all about controlling the temperature, which is gonna be hard enough using solid element heating, you want to minimize how much the pan cools when you introduce the eggs. As mentioned before in this thread, let them stand at room temperature for a bit before you start. Then tilt the pan to the side (so the fat forms a pool along the lip) and pour slowly into that, leveling the pan back out as you go. This will get the eggs cooking before they ever touch the pan, which will not only prevent them from sticking, but will also save your pan from a sudden drop in temperature.

  6. #16
    StephanFowler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Acworth, Ga
    Posts
    168
    Quote Originally Posted by Vertigo View Post
    Wait, I got more!

    Since it's all about controlling the temperature, which is gonna be hard enough using solid element heating, you want to minimize how much the pan cools when you introduce the eggs. As mentioned before in this thread, let them stand at room temperature for a bit before you start. Then tilt the pan to the side (so the fat forms a pool along the lip) and pour slowly into that, leveling the pan back out as you go. This will get the eggs cooking before they ever touch the pan, which will not only prevent them from sticking, but will also save your pan from a sudden drop in temperature.


    what about added veggies, obviously precook them but should they be introduced hot (straight out of the other pan) or room temp?

  7. #17
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,090
    I pull the omelet and fold it before it's finished cooking, letting it's own heat finish it off. Doing it like that, I introduce the fillings hot right before folding. Some people take a more "frittata" approach, in which case you can introduce them lukewarm.

  8. #18
    Senior Member FryBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Hermosa Beach, California
    Posts
    235
    Like your wife, I'm not a big egg fan; I'm happy with my nonstick and see no reason to switch. I suggest you try one before devoting a lot of money and energy to producing the perfect omelet for someone who would rather have a bowl of oatmeal.
    Doug Collins
    Hermosa Beach, California

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Posts
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by Vertigo View Post
    Like Citizen said, it takes a good deal of practice to really nail it. Start to finish, your omelet should take about 15 seconds.
    How many eggs do you use for your omelette?

  10. #20
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,090
    Quote Originally Posted by phasedweasel View Post
    How many eggs do you use for your omelette?
    Three, usually.

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts