Quantcast
stick or full dose it matter.
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24

Thread: stick or full dose it matter.

  1. #1
    Sponsors

    Bill Burke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Lives in the mountains near Boise, Idaho.
    Posts
    494

    stick or full dose it matter.

    the other day I was contacted by a (in his opinion) high end french chef. He had heard that I made knives and was interested in one. I took a san mai tamahagane and 52100 gyoto with a hidden tang to show him. He looked at it without comment and then told me that all "good" chef's knives had full tangs. I told him that I had heard that OPINION and made both styles but didn't neccessarily agree. But It made me curious enough to ask the opinions here. So what do you guys think?

  2. #2

    echerub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    1,776
    That's a pretty prevalent view, and one that I certainly subscribed to for a number of years. I'm now a big wa-handle fan, so clearly I don't think the full-tang notion is a big deal.

    As long as it's not a welded-on spindly little thing like you see from cheapie novelty knives, I don't particularly care whether it's a partial tang or full tang. A decent tang created in one piece along with the blade is perfectly sound.

  3. #3


    Dave Martell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Homeless, PA
    Posts
    9,441
    The European factory knifemakers have marketed the full tang/rivet thing as being superior for many years now so this is somewhat engraved into the minds of all kitchen knife users except for those who get into the higher end stuff. The latter seek knowledge and find truth.

  4. #4

    ecchef's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    In the Village.
    Posts
    3,174
    I used to believe the same crap. I'm a little surprised that a French chef said that , considering that French makers have produced Nogent style knives for eons.

    Personally, I prefer hidden tangs. I think it's more sanitary, puts more weight forward, & is easier to tailor to an individual grip. I'm not saying that there's anything wrong with full tangs. I use them just as often.
    Though I could not caution all I still might warn a few; Don't raise your hand to raise no flag atop no ship of fools. - Robert Hunter

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Near Seattle, WA
    Posts
    290
    +1 on hidden tangs. If the scales shrink just a touch on a full-tang handle, then you have an uneven and sometimes sharp burr all the way around the handle. It just seems like there are too many opportunities for failure there with the rivets/pins and in the junction to the bolsters as well.
    -M

  6. #6
    As Chad Ward says in his book "An Edge in the Kitchen" : "Unless you are planning to jack up your car or pry open doors with your chef's knife, the tang plays little or no role in its strength and durability. It does help establish the balance and feel of the knife, but as we discussed with bolsters, there are many ways to balance the knife. With modern manufacturing methods it is inexpensive to place riveted handle slabs on a full tang. A full tang is a manufacturing choice and a stylistic choice. If you like them, great, have at it. Just keep in mind that any reasonably sized tang that extends at least two thirds of the way into the handle will be fine.

    If you insist on a full tang, you'll miss out on a huge array of truly spectacular knives. Want to spend a couple of thousand dollars on a custom made Japanese yanagiba (sashimi knife) hand forged by a master craftsman with a 700 year history of knife making behind him? Oops, can't do it, the yanagiba has a stick tang. Want a reasonably priced chef's knife that won't expire if it finds its way into the dishwasher every once in a while. Sorry. Hidden tang. You're out of luck.

    The tang should be pretty far down on your list of things to look for when choosing a knife or two to outfit your kitchen."


    Personally: I agree with Chad - The tang should be pretty far down on your list of things to look for when choosing a knife or two to outfit your kitchen

  7. #7
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    3,472
    i think i should be pretty far down on your list of things to look for when choosing a knife or fifty-two to outfit your kitchen.

  8. #8
    Sponsors

    Bill Burke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Lives in the mountains near Boise, Idaho.
    Posts
    494
    Thanks guys, I prefer hidden tang knives. they are a bit harder to construct with integral bolsters, but save alot of material when forged.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Rockport, TX
    Posts
    4,892
    It's attractive. That's about it.

    No function, and sometimes it can be a huge drawback. Ask him WHY a full tang is important, and if he's ever seen a knife fail because it wasn't full-tang.

  10. #10
    Delbert Ealy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Indian River, MI Just under The Bridge
    Posts
    1,034
    I prefer to make full tang knives, which makes me something of an oddball, although for use, as long as it is well-made I don't think it matters. After steel became popular to use, most swords from many cultures were made with narrow tangs. If those people trusted their lives to those tangs, then who am I to argue? (many bronze swords were made with full-tang construction.)
    I construct knives with full tangs because I prefer the style, not because of any strength issues.

    Laminated metals specialist, Kitchen knife and gadget maker
    www.ealyknives.com
    www.mokume-jewelry.net
    "Build a man a fire and he will be warm for a day, set a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life"

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts