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Thread: Knife for super-fine cutting?

  1. #1
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    Knife for super-fine cutting?

    I am in the market for a knife but basically at the minute I am not sure which to get, hence this post. Part of my job involves cutting up salad-type ingredients such as lettuce, onions carrots and all that. At the minute I use a white steel 210 petty. However, I am thinking of getting a knife that can perform super-fine cutting a little better, but I don't know which to buy. I am thinking a yanagi? perhaps an usuba? I really don't know. The knife would be used for things like super-fine julienne of carrots, or cutting translucent slices of tomatoes, that kinda thing. Anyone any idea which knife would perform such tasks the best?

  2. #2
    Sounds like a job for an usuba with the right technique since the edge is dead flat.

  3. #3

    ecchef's Avatar
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    +1 Usuba. Or Kiritsuke.
    Though I could not caution all I still might warn a few; Don't raise your hand to raise no flag atop no ship of fools. - Robert Hunter

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    Sounds like a job for an usuba to me

  5. #5
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    It's simple to do fine cuts with a Nakiri, the small size makes it agile, and its flat edge, did nice straight cuts. I wouldn't be surprised, if a Nakiri,had a longer flat edge, then a 210mm or even 240mm gyuto. The downside of a Nakiri is the same as any small knife a lack of production.

    The lack of production was reason enough for me to try a small cleaver. The nakiri did a better job at cutting, but its not a significant difference over the cleaver. The difference is similar to suji and a gyuto. The suji does a better at cutting, gyuto at production.

    A while back, when I was looking at double beveled kiritsukes when it occurred to me, that it was a long nakiri with a tip. I ordered a Moritaka, because it was cheap. The long flat edge does a nice job with vegetables. The surprise was the tip. It gets very thin towards the edge, but it feels like its on a strong and stable base. So I have no worries about breaking it off, unlike some of my thin knives.

    Jon with JKI, has a Konosuke HD 240mm double beveled kiritsuke, that would probably be ideal for your situation. A less expensive option would be the Sugimoto #30 cleaver.

    Jay

  6. #6
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    An usuba or similar single bevel knife is the obvious choice and probably the route I'd take. However, an extremely asymmetrically ground double-bevel knife will do a reasonable job but depending on how extreme you push it, it may lose some of it's all-purpose functionality due to edge weakness.

  7. #7
    If you've got gentle boards and demand perfection over productivity, I'd go Usuba.

  8. #8
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    definitely usuba. this is, in fact, precisely what i use my usuba for.

  9. #9
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    kamagata usuba
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  10. #10
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Perhaps a K2 HRC60 by Robert Herder, Solingen.

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