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  1. #11
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    Sometimes people talking about how dangerous knives are makes me wonder if they are just talking because they can. I mean I consider irresponsible parents way more dangerous to their kids. I think people sometimes are just plain lazy and rather than take the time to do things right they seem to say something is dangerous and just ignore something that sooner or later they are going to have to deal with.

    For example I was a pyromaniac when I was young, and rather than have someone explain to me why fire is dangerous, they just hid the matches. Soon after I found them and I did some dumb things, all because rather than let me play with fire under a supervised condition I had to do it by myself. Luckily no one got hurt.

  2. #12
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    1. Working with a sorta-sharp knife is actually a different skillset from working with edges that are truly sharp. I've seen guys do things I can't do, because my knives are too sharp. If I did that, I'd hack my finger off. That said, there is stuff I do that they can't...and my food stays fresh longer.
    The point about things staying fresher with proper sharp knives is often overlooked I think. There are others I work with who could perhaps cut a little quicker than me, but the things I cut are just nicer and will stay fresher for way longer than anything anyone else cuts. The feel of a cucumber or a tomato cut with a proper sharp knife versus one cut with a blunt Victorinox is totally totally different

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by stevenStefano View Post
    The point about things staying fresher with proper sharp knives is often overlooked I think. There are others I work with who could perhaps cut a little quicker than me, but the things I cut are just nicer and will stay fresher for way longer than anything anyone else cuts. The feel of a cucumber or a tomato cut with a proper sharp knife versus one cut with a blunt Victorinox is totally totally different
    Yes it is. A sharp set of knives can pay for their sharpening job in a week at a restaurant with any standards for quality. My boss put me in charge of cutting everything that needs being cut at work, for the entire operation, because my tomatoes don't look mealy, my onions aren't giant translucent slabs, my lettuce keeps longer, etc. Try explaining that to the average food service manager.


    I want to also add my favorite sharpening story ever. I remember this moment vividly. I had just gotten decent at sharpening and took a guy's knife from the BoH at the sushi bar, a Dexter chinese cleaver. It had chips in it, and he wanted it sharpened. I stupidly rubbed it on a 2k shapton pro(my 2nd stone ever) for about 45 minutes, didn't get all the chips out(duh). But I did sharpen it somewhat. I gave it back and told him I called it quits, and he said, "No, it's very GOOD, guey!" I went to the front and got my Tojiro and had him slice a sweet potato square off the board. Then I gave him mine. After it fell through the potato, he looked at me like someone had pranked him, or he had walked into a surprise magic show. The bleary-eyed stare of childlike confusion was the best reaction I've ever gotten to a knife I sharpened.

  4. #14

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    Have to love stories like this. Had one about a week ago. The head was getting ready to do some prep next to me so I asked him if he wanted to use one of mine. (I was wanting to test out a new stone, so I needed a dull knife) He basically jumped at the chance. The knife in question is a 240 TKC, which had only been stropped for the past two weeks (used at work and home lightly, so not talking fresh off the stone) But anyways. So he starts using it and after a few minutes I see him leave real quick. I didn't think to much of it so went back to my prep. He comes back a minute later putting a band-aid on. The sous asked him what happened, and it turns out that he poked himself with the tip, (Absolutely none of our house knives have any sort of tip or point) So after that was all over he comes over and says that, that was he finest knife he ever used, and how sharp it was. I almost didn't want to tell him that it had been used for the past while... almost. he then gave me a slightly funny look when I said that it could be better.

  5. #15
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    Another cool thing that people commented while I was in school is that when I sharpened some of my peers knives, they ALWAYS ended up cutting part of their fingernails off or some knuckle meat... That generation sure knows how to properly tuck their fingers.

  6. #16
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    Response to Memorael

    This is highly true. IT is much more effective to teach someone in a calm way why something is dangerous or what the proper way to do something is than to fly off the handle and take away the supposed source of the problem. Only thing I would add though is that sometimes people just do dumb stuff because they can or because they don't care about the consequences.
    Last edited by G-rat; 09-20-2011 at 08:21 PM. Reason: Meant to respond to Memorael not the reply above mine.

  7. #17
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    About the Michael Rader pass around blade Eamon said this..

    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    I got it with a really hair-popping edge, it push cut paper like crazy. I was humbled because I felt that whoever sharpened this must be far better than I am.

    Thanks, coming from someone like you who truly knows what sharp really is that meant a lot to me.

    I get strange looks all the time when people use my knives and say "wow thats sharp" and I'm like, "meh I haven't sharpened that thing in weeks."
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  8. #18
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    Now that is just funny Mr. Drinky. The edit reason was that you were drunk.......and the edit time stamp was 10:55.....a.m.

  9. #19
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    ...and on a Tuesday.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike View Post
    Isn't it great how people like to shift responsibility? My wife and I taught our boys from a young age how to handle both guns and knives. They are now 9 and 13 and they both handle tools and weapons better than the majority of adults I've met (keep in mind, this goes for my military experience too). Much like everything else, people would rather avoid things they perceive as dangerous rather than taking the time to learn, teach or understand the correct way to handle them. Heck if I had a dollar for every comment people have made in regards to my boys growing up with pitbulls, guns, knives and power tools! :-) Ok. Rant over.
    +1 Couldn't agree more. Teaching children about these things, and letting them understand when/how to handle them removes the mystery and taboo. One of my mentors with firearms starting letting his children touch his when he was cleaning them and they were disassembled...then they graduated to helping clean them...and after that to using them. This taught them that these things are about responsibility first, and everything else second.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

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