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New Mizuno 270 Gyuto
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Thread: New Mizuno 270 Gyuto

  1. #1
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    New Mizuno 270 Gyuto

    So it came in the mail! My first gyuto and its a beaut. Koki did a nice job making sure I got one with a nicely rounded spine and choil. Its not perfect like on my buddy's Konosuke but it the nicest finish I've bought on a spine or choil. As you can see it has the large cosmetic secondary bevel. It is interesting because the hamon line bleeds into this cosmetic finish and disappears underneath the cladding. It is certainly cosmetic but it also begins exactly where the knife begins to taper down to its incredibly thin edge. It looks like the grind was convexed from the shop. When I received it there wasn't really much of an edge on the knife. It was super thin and would cut but I wouldn't call it sharp. Here's where I got giddy.

    So I am bad with uploading photos. I will just give you the link to my public mobileme gallery. You can check it out there.

    http://gallery.me.com/sllathan#100086

    I decided to take the knife to the stones and put a new edge on it. This steel is TOUGH! I mean really tough. I am used to Aogami Super that sharpens up super easily. I can create a burr on any of my moritakas in what feels like a blink of an eye. Not so with this knife. It took 15 minutes of sharpening on my naniwa 400 to begin to run a burr the length of the knife and about 5 minutes more once it finally started to take one. The steel just feels immensely sturdy and like it would hold the edge you put on it for a long long time. I guess time will tell at the kitchen I work at. I finished sharpening and polishing the new edge up to my 5k Naniwa superstone and finishing with a strop on felt and chromium oxide. As you can tell by the scratches I am not the most skilled but I can put a nice edge on a knife at least I think so! When I was done I put a microbevel on the edge and started shaving a sweet potato on the board. Sure it wedges a little but that's cause its got a thick spine and the knife does a lot of the cutting obviously especially at the heel.
    Another thing that is awesome is the hamon is far enough back on the blade that there are a good 8-10 flattenings I can get out of this knife before it starts to wear into the cladding. My Moritakas hamons come almost to the edge of the blade making the core steel in them less available for extended years of flattening and resharpening.

    This is my first gyuto and I am super impressed.


    Here's what is dissapointing.
    You can see on the top of the ferrule whoever fixed the tang in the handle used some sort of epoxy or something to seal it off airtight around the tang and ended up letting a lot of the goop dry on the top of the horn. Kinda looks gross, But then again soon enough this thing is gonna have all sorts of dead animals all over it anyway. I wasn't looking for a drawer queen I wanted a bulldozer that would dish out a beating and be able to take one.

    Only other thing is that the handle kind of blows but after sharpening this knife I know I paid for amazing quality steel and not a nice handle.

    Let me know if the pics don't work. It was just easier to post them there than to set up an account with some picture hosting website. I'm in the middle of a couple heavy assignments for grad school.

    Also sorry the pics suck I just used my iPhone and its camera with my crappy skills makes for poo poo pictures.

  2. #2
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    Last thing is that the geometry is wonderful. In a pinch grip it feels like an extension of my arm. I like a blade heavy knife and my moritaka cleaver which I sometimes use for 4 or 5 hours at a time is probably time and a half the weight if not twice the weight so I was surprised at how light this knife feels in the hand. Very nimble and very comfortable. Obviously it could be more nimble with a little more distal taper towards the tip so that the tip was pointier and skinnier but I like it the way it is.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Citizen Snips's Avatar
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    First of all, Congratulations buddy!!!

    you are really gonna love this knife. i like that you took the time to get a knife that is exactly what you wanted. cant wait to get my hands on it

    anyway, if you really do not like the handle, im sure you could ask around here for a new one (ahem marko) and ship it off. i personally do not like "D" shaped handles and think they are uncomfortable but really its all up to the personal preference of the user as its going to be in their hands for countless hours, not mine.

    please keep us posted on how this works out for you after a few weeks of shifts and sharpening sessions.

  4. #4
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    I love how all the photos are from in your car. Couldn't wait till you got it home eh? The Mizuno isn't super common but it seems to be highly regarded by some members here, glad you like it

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevenStefano View Post
    I love how all the photos are from in your car. Couldn't wait till you got it home eh? The Mizuno isn't super common but it seems to be highly regarded by some members here, glad you like it
    haha yeah citizensnips was joking with me about that today when I txted him about the knife. I was trying to shave my arm with it at 9:30am in my car outside the post office while smoking a cigarette...the looks I got were awesome.

  6. #6
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    i really like mine, especially once i got rid of the stock handle. i don't really find the steel to be hard to work on; sharpens up quickly and nicely, just like all the other carbon knives i have. good geometry, especially at the tip, and thin behind the edge. doesn't corrode particularly readily. really nice knife. these don't have a hamon, which is caused by differential hardening, what you are referring to is where the higane (core steel) is exposed past the jigane (cladding).

  7. #7
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    I need to try one of these! I've been meaning to ever since I saw UglyJoe's (I think.) review.

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    may I just ask , not sure if you mentioned in the post and I just dont see , is this the Hontanren series mizuno ?

    I have been thinking of purchasing one for seemingly forever , or a masamoto KS , it takes forever for me to decide on these things


    it really looks like a nice knife , cant wait to hear a review after some usage

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by joex175 View Post
    may I just ask , not sure if you mentioned in the post and I just dont see , is this the Hontanren series mizuno ?

    I have been thinking of purchasing one for seemingly forever , or a masamoto KS , it takes forever for me to decide on these things


    it really looks like a nice knife , cant wait to hear a review after some usage
    Yep its the hontanren.

    It is a nice knife. I'll be using it all weekend. It will be interesting for me to see how the edge I put on the blade holds up. I'm so used to sharpening a straight edge on my cleaver or my bosses' nakiri that it is really difficult for me to get the curve of the blade sharpened correctly (or if you want to be picky you can tell from my freshly sharpened picture that I have trouble with the whole process.). My petties have a curve but are much smaller and weigh less and are easy to manage. All this to say my review will be colored by whatever kind of edge I put on it. It is nice and even but as I cut things with it tonight the edge just doesn't quite feel right. I mean it basically flies through stuff and cuts evenly and swiftly through stuff but on a slightly under ripe tomato it was squishing when I push cut just a little. Guess I just need to keep working on the edge and perhaps thin behind the edge a little?

  10. #10
    Senior Member UglyJoe's Avatar
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    I noticed this a little bit with mine as well when I first got it. It is my opinion (hotly debated by others here) that the shinogi on this knife is NOT cosmetic. In fact, I use it as a guide for sharpening. The angle difference between the blade road and the thick of the blade is very, very small, so if you try to sharpen it like you would say a yanagi, it's almost guaranteed you will "break" the shinogi line, and the knife won't be as pretty... particularly if you work with a lot of mud on your stone. This doesn't bother me. I sharpen mine by putting pressure just on the edge of the knife but having the knife flat on the stone at the edge, so that the scratch marks hit almost all of the hagane (the hard core steel that makes up the edge). I then lay the knife flat on the stone and put pressure right below the "shinogi" line on the opposite side of the blade (the side your fingers are actually touching). This, for me, would abrade metal from the shinogi down to the bevel that I hit in first step. Then with a gentle rolling motion I blend both bevels together. This makes it look like one bevel from the shinogi down to the edge. It also gives the knife a very thin edge with a nice convexness to it that makes it a superior cutter. Finally I put a microbevel at 35-40* on the outside face of the knife only, and call it done. It's a long process, but I've found that I only have to touch up the microbevel, usually on a strop but every once in a while on my finishing stone, to bring the edge back to screaming life. I only have to go through the whole sharpening process maybe once every 6 months, if that (home user, so I'm sure more often for a pro). I think this is the way the knife was designed to be sharpened. One hint is that everyone I've known to get one (including myself) has commented on their being basically no edge bevel (like we see on most gyutos OOTB, even if the edge itself isn't great), but that the knife still cut well OOTB. I think this is because the knife was initially sharpened the way I described, with the edge bevel blended back up into the secondary bevel of the knife so that you don't really see it, with a tiny microbevel, if they bothered with a microbevel at all. I wish I had the opportunity to see another one OOTB to see if my suspicions are correct.

    Anyway, sharpened this way the knife flies through almost everything - it's still a thick knife at the spine and so it will wedge in tall, hard produce a little regardless of what kind of sharpening you put it through, unless you thin the knife from spine to edge which is basically changing the knife completely.

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