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Thread: How old are pre-Sabatier Trompettes?

  1. #11
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Wow! What a beauty...
    It seems in really excellent shape, none of the very, very common issues here. I hope you didn't pay a fortune.

    Just for fun: by the same maker, from la Belle Époque, a Falcon, small carbon steel knife, solid silver, partially gold plated, given to a boy at the occasion of his solemn communion, a Roman-Catholic ritual.


  2. #12
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Curiously, it won't be easy to establish with certainty your knife's age. I only recently heard of Nogent blades made even in the fifties. It won't be simple to say whether it is from 1890 or 1936, if it has been made with an old school rat-tail tang and an ebony handle.


  3. #13
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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  4. #14
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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  5. #15
    Thank you. I really like the shape and light weight of this knife. It is more gracile than my more modern German cooking knives, which are enjoyed as well, but ever since seeing this blade shape on a cooking show I was hooked. It was not inexpensive, but justified it as a 50th birthday present to myself.

  6. #16
    That knife screams Belle Époque! Thank you for sharing.

  7. #17
    The finger guard has concentric machining marks with the tang as the epicenter. Some of these have been ground away, but I am nearly certain that the tang was machined in a lathe. It might make this knife younger than I was imagining.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Could you make a photo of the handle's butt?
    When it's the original handle, in Levine's words:
    The tang would have been longer than the handle, peened over a tiny nickel silver burr at the butt end.
    Also very thin.
    The original ebony handles tend to split, because they are bored down the center with a large diameter hole, leaving just a thin web of wood on the sides. They look solid, but they're not.

  9. #19
    Yes, I'll take a photo and post it. Indeed, the end of the tang is very thin and appears to be peened at the butt end. I think I'll take the knife to work tomorrow and make an X-ray of it for fun, and hopefully see the dimensions and geometry of the tang, and any gaps between the tang and the handle.

  10. #20
    Dave Martell's Avatar
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    According to Goins' Encyclopedia of Cutlery Markings

    La Trompette c.1846-1941 - A trademark used by Societe Anonyme



    According to Levine's Guide to Knives and Their Values (4th Edition)

    "In the United States up through World War I, the standard French-made sabatier chef knife was the Trumpet Brand, La Trompette. Goins states that this was J. A. (John Augustine) Sabatier's own brand, and remained in his family until 1920. From 1920-1941, it belonged to a Louis S. M. Pouzet. Trumpet sabatiers have high quality lightweight blades, but their one piece ebony handles are weak and brittle."


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