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Thread: Crazy sharp

  1. #1
    Senior Member Keith Neal's Avatar
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    Crazy sharp

    I'm just a home cook, and happy to spend more time sharpening than cutting. I want to get my knives as sharp as possible, just for the principle of it. OK, I'm just a knife nut.

    I have been studying the subject for a while, and bought DVD's, and practiced. But I am still looking for the best answer.

    Once I get a decent edge, how do I get the ridiculously sharp edge?

    De-burr with cork or soft wood or stones or leather?

    Strop on fine stones? Superfine stones? Leather strop? Newspaper? Microbevel?

    Knife nuts, help.
    If you reach the age of 60 without becoming a curmudgeon, you haven't been paying attention.

  2. #2
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    how about you tell us what you are currently doing.

    but even before hearing what you do ill say these things:
    there are really no magic tricks other then spending time on the stones and holding consistent angles.
    kinda like me asking my buddy who has been sharpening for years why he gets a better edge off a 500grit stone then my 10k polished knife.
    he reply would just be try to practice more perfectly because perfect practice makes perfect.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Citizen Snips's Avatar
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    i agree with dough. buying dvds, spending time reading on these forums, talking to people, and buying expensive stones wont get you the experience you will get from getting your hands muddy.

    there are so many things you can learn from everyone here and from dvds but none of them can come close practice from putting in hours and hours on the stones

  4. #4
    I have now Tormek T7 bought from new with the spare "japanese waterstone wheel" of 4000 grit.
    Whats important is that machine keeps continously angle close to perfect, but theres more to sharpening than that only.

    The experience you gain is the feeling under you fingertips, when you just know where you abrade, you know how and where to press, and also what stones/strops/magic use.

    Noone can tell you whats best, just work it out yourself.

  5. #5
    I would recommend you do a lot of different things often to see what happens, that's how you learn the small nuances which take a knife from good to spectacular.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Keith Neal's Avatar
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    I have been working on sharpening for a year or so, trying all of the techniques I mentioned. I am primarily experimenting with my Masamoto yanagiba, which is barely "three finger" sharp now, but I suspect it could be better.

    I thought perhaps it would save me some time experimenting if I heard from those of you who have settled on a routine that works consistently.
    If you reach the age of 60 without becoming a curmudgeon, you haven't been paying attention.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Ratton's Avatar
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    Hi There,

    As long as you are de-burring on something that is what matters, personally I use a hard felt pad.

    My defining moment going from sharp to crazy sharp was when I started finishing my sharpening session off by stropping on a leather strop loaded with diamond spray. For me it made the difference like between day and night!!

  8. #8
    Senior Member Keith Neal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ratton View Post
    Hi There,

    As long as you are de-burring on something that is what matters, personally I use a hard felt pad.

    My defining moment going from sharp to crazy sharp was when I started finishing my sharpening session off by stropping on a leather strop loaded with diamond spray. For me it made the difference like between day and night!!
    Thanks! That is very helpful. I was leaning the same way, but wanted some more input. Figuring it out by myself is not the most efficient way to learn.

    Any other thoughts from the experts here would be appreciated.

    Keith
    If you reach the age of 60 without becoming a curmudgeon, you haven't been paying attention.

  9. #9
    Senior Member wenus2's Avatar
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    I will agree that adding a finishing strop was the single greatest improvement for me too. I use CrO on Balsa. I don't think it really matters what it is you use, obviously Carter seems to get his knives kind of sharp using just newspaper, just so long as one picks a medium and strops on it I think it adds benefit.
    -Enjoy the ride. *** All statements made herein are my personal opinion and nothing more, regardless of tone or context. ***

  10. #10
    Before the days of stropping and all the sprays and stuff all that we had was 10k stones. No natural high grit finishers and no how to manuals. The best bet was to ask Dave what he did and many even after following Dave's advice had to find out what worked best for them.

    Everyone here that is a veteran knows this and even Dave has mentioned how all the knives he receives from knife nuts have a distinct signature. Which is why I would recommend to not use strops until you can get a very sharp edge using just a 1k and to experiment. Have you seen CDawgs videos? he sharpens nothing like what is usually recommended around here and he almost won the sharpening olympics.

    There are no short cuts, if you want to sharpen like a pro you need to put in your hours and experiment. More than anything understanding what is happening to your knife with different strokes, grits and knife position while sharpening.

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