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Thread: wood cutting boards in a commercial kitchen

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveInMesa View Post
    Being peer-reviewed, unfortunately, no longer means anything.
    Uh ... you could say that being peer-reviewed doesn't mean everything, but certainly means something. Anyway, you're citing studies that are peer-reviewed, that I've read, that I think are perfectly reasonable.

    The only point I disputed is that wood cutting boards have active bacteriocidal properties. I've never seen a study that demonstrated this. I did not say this to suggest that wood boards aren't safe. The science says they're perfectly safe, when used properly, but for reasons unrelated to that hypothesis. Like you, I use both. I prefer wood.

    Not all the studies I've read agree with one another, but the general consensus is that both wood and plastic are safe, if properly maintained and properly cleaned. Proper cleaning and maintenance is a bit different for each, so we need to know what we're doing.

    The Kass study you cite finds that a knife-scarred wood board harbors less recoverable bacteria than a knife-scarred plastic board. Which is to say, wood seems to be more tolerant of poor maintenance. But in any case, it's safest with either kind of board to maintain the thing properly ... which in most cases with poly boards means replacing them often. Unless someone's finally found a reasonable way to sand the things.


  2. #22
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    It might not mean much about the verity of the content, but it means a lot of the effect a study has on public opinion. And that is what counts, no?


  3. #23
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    I think spreading the idea that wood kills germs is deceptive and dangerous. The really message is that wood and plastic are both safe, provided you do x, y, and z.

  4. #24
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    So here is a bit of an update: I am two months into this experiment. Edge retention has more than doubled. I should not be surprised but seriously... doubled at least. I am now really considering getting a Hi-soft or similar board for work. Moving to a high quality synthetic would save me any possible grief from higher-ups about the use of wood yet hopefully still provide the benefits of using a forgiving surface. The board I have kept at work is quite small so my small collection of 270 knives have been unused recently since I have been favoring my smaller 240's and 210's. Anyone know of good deals on a hi quality synthetic board that is commercial kitchen sized? I am thinking 40cm x 70cm+.

    I still feel a little weird/snobby(?) about providing and hefting around my own board but ditching poly is clearly a good thing.


    Cheers,
    rj

  5. #25
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    Do they make them colour coded?
    I have some nice tamarind wood blocks that I can't use and I really can't stand the standard plastic ones but they have to be colour coded

  6. #26
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    All else equal, wood boards certainly look better than any plastic I've seen.....(I may be a little biased but don't think many would disagree)

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulraphael View Post
    Uh ... you could say that being peer-reviewed doesn't mean everything, but certainly means something.
    I believe I said it doesn't mean anything, rather than everything, but okay. I guess it does mean something. It means that whoever wrote the article made the effort to get someone to at least say they reviewed it, and then made the effort to submit to enough journals to get it published. That's all it means, these days.

    I've seen proof that anyone with enough time to waste can write the most idiotic pseudo-scientific drivel imaginable, get it reviewed by any number of "review whores", and get it published in a supposedly reputable peer-reviewed journal. I've seen it done, intentionally, to prove the point. That science has come to this is tragic, in my view, but it's a fact.

    That's why it's important to know the source and the motivation behind any scientific reports, these days. 90% of it is funded by industries that expect, and get, results that paint their products/efforts in the best possible light, and that makes it unreliable, reviewed or not. There are exceptions, such as when a school with no axe to grind tackles a subject, such as cutting boards, in an unbiased manner for the sake of pure science. But that's why it's important to know the source, and to have good BS-detecting skills which, as the recent election proved, are sorely lacking in this country at this time.

  8. #28
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    My half-cynical comment was about peer review meaning something about the effectiveness of using that study in getting your way

  9. #29
    Senior Member spoiledbroth's Avatar
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    Are Sani tuff like the thicker more square commercial cutting boards? They seem softer than the standard commercial hard plastic evetyone hates? Those are decent too, approaching hisoft imo.
    Blue skies over bad lands

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulraphael View Post
    I think spreading the idea that wood kills germs is deceptive and dangerous.
    You can think anything you like, but do you have any basis for that opinion, or is it simply that you don't like it and that's that?

    I assume you have no background in science or analysis, since you (like many others) seem to have completely overlooked or failed to understand the facts stated. But, let's hear your theory to explain why, after smearing equal amounts of bacteria on new wooden and plastic boards, the bacteria on the wooden boards died and the ones on the plastic boards did not, bearing in mind that the researchers did nothing to account for that difference.


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