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    Intalling a new knife handle.

    Hey all. Well I recently got a 240 Moritaka Kiritsuke, and me being a lefty I hate the D shape handle so I saw at Epicurean edge they sell a replacement octagonal and I was wondering if I could use epoxy to attach it to the handle instead of sending it to them? Also how hard is it to knock off old one? Any tips? Thanks again.

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    Dave Martell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aaronsgibson View Post
    Hey all. Well I recently got a 240 Moritaka Kiritsuke, and me being a lefty I hate the D shape handle so I saw at Epicurean edge they sell a replacement octagonal and I was wondering if I could use epoxy to attach it to the handle instead of sending it to them? Also how hard is it to knock off old one? Any tips? Thanks again.

    Some Moritaka handles have been tough or impossible for me to knock off but then I really don't try too hard most of the time since I don't risk injury to myself or knife for an old handle. If it is stuck I chisel it off in a split second (or two).

    Yes you can attach the new handle with epoxy although you'll likely have to do some fitting yourself with a small file/rasp to get it into place correctly beforehand.

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    Dave Martell's Avatar
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    For knocking off the handle search for Marko's handle removal technique.

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    removing an old handle and fitting a new one can range from moderate effort to extremely difficult. Knives vary a great deal in how tight the original fit is, whether epoxy was used, shape of tang, shape of hole in the replacement handle, etc.. Go for it if you've got the time and energy, but keep in mind if things don't go as planned it could be sitting on your workbench when you might want it in the kitchen.

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    Hmm. I think I must ponder on this a little longer. Thanks everyone.

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    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aaronsgibson View Post
    Hmm. I think I must ponder on this a little longer. Thanks everyone.
    I have removed a handle from Moritaka gyuto. It is doable, but prepare to give it a few blows to knock it off.

    As for installing a new one, it's not that difficult. Epicurean Edge handles' cavities are huge, and Moritaka is not known for particularly long or difficult tangs, at least that was my impression.

    So here is how I would do it. I would make sure that the handle's cavity is at least 4" deep. The tang will probably be between 3-4" long, but you want to be on a safe side or you will need to file it down.

    Knock the handle off using a piece of wood that is longer by 3-5" than your blade and some sort of mallet or a hammer. I posted on KF how I do it along with pictures. It should still be there. PM me if you have questions or type in Google search removing wa handle site:knifeforums.com. You should find it this way.

    Wrap drywall fiberglass tape (simple solution but works well when tang hole is oversize) around the tang to build up to the same thickness as the tang hole and insert the tang into the handle. Fiberglass tape is sticky, so the first layer will stick the tang and the subsequent to the layers below. This is a good way to sit your handle straight, and build-up thickness has enough give if you need to make adjustments. Then, you apply epoxy around the tang.

    Applying epoxy after you inserted the tang gives you more control to sit the handle straight, will make installation less messy, and in mortice and tenon construction handle, there is not need to fill the whole cavity with epoxy. Epoxy will sink in a little, apply some more, until you fill the area flush around the tang. You can color your epoxy with a pigment to make it less noticeable. I use black pigment. Have a lot of it, if you need some.

    If you don't have a syringe, use a tooth pick to lift a small amount of epoxy and apply it into the tang hole. Repeat as many times as it takes to fill the area. Use rubbing alcohol (92% concentration or something like that) and paper towels to clean up epoxy if you get it on the blade. And use gloves, as no matter how careful you are, you will get epoxy on your hands. Not a big deal (use alcohol to clean it) but if you can avoid it, why not?

    It's really that simple. Go for it.



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    Haha. Not sure if I would call that simple. That and I'm not much of what you would call a wood worker. So might just say screw it and use the D shape. But who knows maybe I'll go even more crazy and dive in and try it one day. But thanks a lot guys.

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    Dave Martell's Avatar
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    Maybe you could try instead to file and sand away the "D" section and go for oval?

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    I've thought about that may opt for it not sure. Thanks Dave.

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