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Thread: raising T on foods

  1. #1
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    raising T on foods

    I've got a recipe that requires cooking to 180 degrees F and my question involves which way to achieve that T while changing the taste of the product the least? In other words, would it be best to cook slowly over a low T with a lid (gently raise the heat) or go ahead and crank the heat and achieve the Temperature quicker?

    Thanks
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  2. #2
    daveb's Avatar
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    Can you do it in a bath?
    Dave
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  3. #3
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    What is the food you're trying to heat? Knowing that would help with solutions (wet vs dry heat, etc)

  4. #4
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    What's the product?
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  5. #5
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    Dave, I guess I could do it in a bath? Trying to do 30-40 quarts at the time so didn't really think about that, would it still be an option?

    The product is a fruit based salsa.
    once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

  6. #6
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    Not a professional chef, but when you crank the heat up there will be a zone of overheated water at the bottom of the pot that will be at 220 or something like that. So you will not be heating to temp, but overheating part and then it will be conducted away. Depending on the product it may or may not be a problem.

    My very limited experience with cooking so far has shown that except from searing and sauteing, gentle and slow rarely hurts.

  7. #7

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    The longer you spend at higher temps (the actual, relevant temps will vary with the item in question and the method being used), the more time the food will spend undergoing one or another enzymatic reaction, which is going to change flavor/texture (whether that's good or bad is dependant). If you are trying to preserve freshness, it seems to me you'd want to spend as little time as possible above storage temps. However: I am not a food chemist.
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