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Thread: Thinking of a copper pan - need some help

  1. #1
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    Thinking of a copper pan - need some help

    Hi,

    our Greenpan (28cm, 8cm tall) seems to be approaching its end and I am looking to replace it with a different one. The surface on the Greenpan (some sort of ceramics) held up reasonably long, but its anti-sticking properties diminished quite a bit. On top of that the pan takes ages to heat up on our glass stove (not inductive).

    After I have heard about the copper pans I became interested about them. It just seems that there are different types and quite a few makers and I am getting a bit lost. I have started to first look at Mauviel, but obviously there are quite a few others.

    For the start - what is the difference between stainless clad copper (like Mauviel Herigtage) and tinn clad one (like Mauviel Tradition)? And what about the pans with silver surface (like Mazzetti)?

    I am opened to your advices and suggestions.

    thanks

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    Tinn and silver clad conducts heat a little better compared to stainless clad. But I am pretty sure you will not notice a difference.
    The thickness of the copper is more important.
    With tinn you might need to re-tinn the pan after years of abuse.
    De Buyer and Ronneby Bruk also have nice copper pans by the way.
    The Demeyere Atlantis low sauce pan has copper only in the bottom of the pan and is very easy to maintain because it is completely stainless.

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    Ever since I saw this thread pop up I've been racking my brain. I've seen some killer copper cookware made in the USA but I couldn't remember where I saw it, so I quit thinking about it and bingo! Hammersmith copper cookware. Kind of expensive, but it looks like it's worth it.

    Well, scratch that one off your list for the time being anyway. Looks like the economy has recovered and they are not accepting any new orders. Good for them, sad for you.

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    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    Interesting. But since I am located in Germany, ordering a heavy copper ware from USA would probably be very expensive.

    One general though of mine on the thickness of the copper. It seems that the preference is - the thicker the better. That can however only serve one purpose - and that is heat distribution (in horizontal direction, so the pan will have more even temperature across its surface) and of course mechanical stability. It does not aid heat transport from the stove to food being cooked.

    I have read that tin surface is less 'sticky' than stainless one. What are the other relevant differences from user point of view?

  5. #5
    My Mauvieal sugar pan is solid copper, the heat transfer is very even and predictable. I'm no expert, but I think its a case of you get what you pay for. I aquired it very second hand ( the handle had snapped off after 15 years in a super busy pro kitchen) and after riveting the handle back on its given me another 5 years and shows no sign of giving up.
    Huw
    In order to make delicious food, you must eat delicious food. Jiro Ono

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    I would do some research first as retinning is expensive IF you can find someone to do it.

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    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    OK, I have read some more and found out that another option would be a so called 'multi clad' pan which has 3 layers (SS, aluminium, SS). It should work about the same as SS clad copper, but for less weight and lower cost.

    Anyone having experience with multi-clad pans like e.g. All-Clad?

  8. #8
    In my opinion, there is no way a multi-clad would react to heat/cold as fast as copper.

    Since you are located in Europe, I suggest that you look at E. Dellerin prices. Their Mauviel copper/tin pans are much cheaper than what I saw anywhere else. You can also send them an e-mail if you are looking for a product that is not listed.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Seth's Avatar
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    Qualifications: I have 12 copper mauviel, some all clad, carbon steel, viking. I started collecting copper 25 years ago and have a mix of thickness and tin/steel.

    Comments:
    I use a 10" carbon daily especially for omelets and high temp searing. Anything that requires some finesse, say like something lightly breaded or fish that could burn is done in copper. I believe there is a difference in that tin is a bit less sticky but I couldn't prove that.

    I read, I think in modernist cuisine that the thickness is not very important with respect to heat dispersion. The material would have to be and inch thick for the geometry to make a difference. I will track this down if needed. I bring this up because if you do a lot of flipping, the thickest 10" or 12" pan will get to your wrist pretty quickly. My 10" thick copper/tin weighs a ton. The 12" copper/steel is thinner for this reason.

    As you are in Europe I would find out who does tinning and the cost, just to know. It is a dying art here in the US. After 25 years of home cooking, some of the tin should be redone but is still in good shape.
    Everywhere you go, there you are.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    I appreciate your comments. Thank you.

    Tin -vs- SS - if there is not considerable difference in sticking, than I would probably go with SS cladding - in particular if it is going to be lighter than tin-clad copper.

    I have checked out E. Dellerin. Are they actually producing the land for Mauviel? The design seems identical and prices very similar (I am comparing to German Amazon).

    I have also 'discovered' pans from German maker called Weyersberg, but their products cost nearly double what Mauviel does.

    When it comes to well know ones like Mauviel, De Buyer, Fulk (or others) - what would be the reason to choose one over the other?

    And of course there are some lover cost options, but I think I would rather get a pan from makers that I can get some references for.

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