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Thread: Japanese cook book

  1. #1

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    Japanese cook book

    I would like to gain some knowledge on Japanese cooking. Aside from websites, does anyone have recommendations on a good (=authentic) Japanese cook book (in English)?

  2. #2
    Senior Member foody518's Avatar
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    What type of cuisine?
    There's pickling/fermenting/the side dishes, nabe stuff, etc. etc.

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    Preferably ordinary home cooked dishes, but sides should also be interesting

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    OISHINBO are graphic novels, not exactly cookbooks but are excellent in teaching about Japanese food and culture.

  5. #5
    Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art by Shizuo Tsuji is my go to Japanese cookbook. It talks about Japanese style, technique, theory, and recipes. It's designed to teach you how to cook Japanese food yourself more than just follow recipes.

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    Maybe to learn a cuisine style, getting a cookbook that is more semi-authentic (as in, with an index that reads like the menu of a quality japanese restaurant outside japan) could be more helpful (unless you have had the home-cooked, traditional food) because there is some frame of reference regarding how things are supposed to come out.

    And I found (not esp with japanese) that recipes from enthusiasts and chefs can be 50% more work but 200% more worth the work compared to what claims to be simple homestyle...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Polycentric View Post
    Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art by Shizuo Tsuji is my go to Japanese cookbook. It talks about Japanese style, technique, theory, and recipes. It's designed to teach you how to cook Japanese food yourself more than just follow recipes.
    That book definetly made the list

    Quote Originally Posted by LifeByA1000Cuts View Post
    Maybe to learn a cuisine style, getting a cookbook that is more semi-authentic (as in, with an index that reads like the menu of a quality japanese restaurant outside japan) could be more helpful (unless you have had the home-cooked, traditional food) because there is some frame of reference regarding how things are supposed to come out.

    And I found (not esp with japanese) that recipes from enthusiasts and chefs can be 50% more work but 200% more worth the work compared to what claims to be simple homestyle...
    That seems like a valid point, any specific recommendations?

  8. #8
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    2nd Japanese cooking a simple art. The older version can be had for nothing on amazon. Far and away the best Japanese cooking reference book I've seen. Doesn't have the glossy photo motif of current cookbooks but it's heavy on technique and understanding the building blocks of the cuisine and pantry. Get it, then supplement as you desire.

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    @Spipet not for japanese cuisine, unfortunately.

    Ah, on the topic of photographs: Cookbooks with good photos are an immense help, but only if the photo *is of the actual food cooked to the actual recipe*, and retouched with restraint. Presentation advice, textural reference (this might be more applicable to thai/chinese/indian cuisine, but the way a sauce reflects light, flows, and coats tells you volumes...), recipe finding ...

  10. #10
    Senior Member Casaluz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LifeByA1000Cuts View Post
    Maybe to learn a cuisine style, getting a cookbook that is more semi-authentic (as in, with an index that reads like the menu of a quality japanese restaurant outside japan) could be more helpful (unless you have had the home-cooked, traditional food) because there is some frame of reference regarding how things are supposed to come out.

    And I found (not esp with japanese) that recipes from enthusiasts and chefs can be 50% more work but 200% more worth the work compared to what claims to be simple homestyle...
    I second without hesitations this recommendation. This book was written precisely to address questions like yours. After that I would suggest "Japanese Farm Food" by Nancy Singleton Hachisu. beautiful, well written and crafted book for both recipes and cultural notes

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