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Thread: Which japanese knife type would be traditionally used to work with stone fruit?

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    Question Which japanese knife type would be traditionally used to work with stone fruit?

    Given the japanese seem to have a defined knife for every ingredient and have stone fruit, surely there is a "right" one (or combination) to use for preparing them?

    A usuba or yanagi would certainly be damaged if you hit a stone or, even worse, make a rotating cut around it. A full deba would wedge or crush the fruit... and if I understand history correctly, boning knives haven't been needed there until comparatively recently?

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    Senior Member Ruso's Avatar
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    Just guessing, mukimino perheps

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    Senior Member Chef Doom's Avatar
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    Having a knife for every ingredient would take thousands of knife types. So that doesn't make any sense whatsoever. I didn't know there was a special melon knife. And where is the special knife to process humans for Cannibal Wednesdays?

    All you need is to pick the opposite of what Bill Clinton would pick. Pick thin my friend.
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    Probably a fruit knife. Aka as a 120-150mm petty. Did the Japanese have double beveled kitchen knives back in the day. You could do this work with an Usuba if you had to. A mukimono should in theory be even more fragile than an usuba. Most I've seen are thinner.

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    Senior Member spoiledbroth's Avatar
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    jussayin' where's the proof any of these knives are so fragile?
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    Senior Member MAS4T0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chef Doom View Post
    Having a knife for every ingredient would take thousands of knife types. So that doesn't make any sense whatsoever. I didn't know there was a special melon knife. And where is the special knife to process humans for Cannibal Wednesdays?

    All you need is to pick the opposite of what Bill Clinton would pick. Pick thin my friend.
    There are melon knives and surely a bowie would be a suitable human knife?

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    Wouldn't try to prep a peach with a saxophone.

    "Having a knife for every ingredient would take thousands of knife types. "

    No, of course not, but thousands of "use x knife for y ingredient" wisdom bits/rules

    Would have guessed usuba/yanagi for working with the flesh, but an ajikiri/thick petty or other mini-deba for hitting the pit (not the moshpit ... but I know while my thick petty (more deba-esque in geometry already at >2mm spine for a 120mm) is fun to use to go through peaches like the other presidents of the USA, that is still 187 on the edge...

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    Out of the japanese blade shapes, I'd go with a Kawamuki

    In real life... I use a petty

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    Senior Member Chef Doom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAS4T0 View Post
    There are melon knives and surely a bowie would be a suitable human knife?
    If I don't see pictures you are full of lies kind sir. LIES!!!!

    Bowies are general tactical knives. Show me that special blade you only pull out to roast a nicely fattened up couch potato raised chick(en) and use for no other ingredient.
    "Into a country where the jails are full, and the mad houses closed." - Charles Bukowski

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    Senior Member Chef Doom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LifeByA1000Cuts View Post
    Wouldn't try to prep a peach with a saxophone.

    "Having a knife for every ingredient would take thousands of knife types. "

    No, of course not, but thousands of "use x knife for y ingredient" wisdom bits/rules

    Would have guessed usuba/yanagi for working with the flesh, but an ajikiri/thick petty or other mini-deba for hitting the pit (not the moshpit ... but I know while my thick petty (more deba-esque in geometry already at >2mm spine for a 120mm) is fun to use to go through peaches like the other presidents of the USA, that is still 187 on the edge...
    Your right, it would be tens of thousands, but so what? I was drinking sake at the time.

    Maybe a usuba/yanagi on some of these shut-ins who don't see the light of day as they die of a heart attack with salty snacks in hand as they try to catch their 254th pokemon, but try that on a construction worker. Or someone who works in mine, it would be chip city man. I can dig the ajikiri though, but it doesn't scream specialized, more like good substitute.

    Whoever posts a arrowhead because that was what the Aztecs (allegedly) used gets kicked in the knee caps!
    "Into a country where the jails are full, and the mad houses closed." - Charles Bukowski

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