Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Gyuto Kiritsuke (double beveled) Questions

  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    5

    Gyuto Kiritsuke (double beveled) Questions

    Hi, I am looking for advice in purchasing a primary use chef's knife and was looking at 240-270mm WA Gyutos and Kiritsukes in the ~$300 price range (max $400). I am not working as a professional chef but occasionally do popup dinners for 40-60 people, have monthly course dinners with friends, and cook daily (so I would say it will see heavy home use). As for my technique, I am classically trained in French cuisine, but every year for the last 10 or so years I set a goal to learn a new ethnic cuisine so my technique changes often.

    I currently use a Shun 8" Classic knife for basic utility. I also have 270mm Yanagiba, 150mm Honesuki, 180mm Funayuki, 6" Shun utility, and 3.5" Shun pairing. All functional but not up to the par I would like. I have had difficulty making precision cuts for presentation. I frequently am making sashimi and nigiri cuts but the Yanagiba isnt capable of making paper thin cuts. I also would like to do carpaccio and charcuterie, if possible.

    All my current knives are stainless steel, except for the Yanagiba which is high carbon. Ive had the knife for 3 years now and feel moderately comfortable with non-stainless steel knife maintenance. With that said, I dont have a preference with either stainless steel or non. I sharpen my own knives with 6000, 1000, and 600 (I dont use the 600 often) grit whetstones and feel very comfortable sharpening double beveled knives, but not great with single beveled. I actually find knife maintenance relaxing so I dont mind a knife that needs a lot of TLC.

    I plan to add a 300mm Fuguhiki and 165 Nakiri knife to my collection within the next year, but first I want a great primary knife. I think the 8" Shun Classic is too short and used my friends 10" Shun Blue Kiritsuke which I liked a lot, eventhough I understand that its double beveled unlike a traditional Kiritsuke. I narrowed down my selection to a few standouts but please let me know if there are any better options.

    Konosuke HD2 Kiritsuke/Gyuto 270mm ($320)
    http://www.This Site Not Allowed Here.com.com/kohd2ki271.html

    Kurosaki AS Gyuto 270mm ($270)
    http://www.This Site Not Allowed Here.com.com/kuaskugy27.html

    Gesshin Ginga White #2 Wa-Gyuto 240mm ($265)
    http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/...-wa-gyuto.html

    Shiro Kamo R2 Gyuto 240mm ($260)
    http://www.This Site Not Allowed Here.com.com/kamo.html

    As I liked the Shun Blue Kiritsuke, would the Konosuke HD2 Kiritsuke/Gyuto be a good choice as a primary knife or would it be redundant with the knives I already have and/or plan to get?

    Also I have done very little research into Fuguhiki and Nakiri knives. Are there any reasonably priced standouts? I can probably spend $500 now if its for 2 knives (including the one primary). Thank you in advance for any help.

  2. #2
    Senior Member jimbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    576
    I've had a few kiritsuke shaped gyutos. The generally flatter profile perhaps makes them less versatile than a regular shaped gyuto. They definitely excel at push and pull cuts however.

  3. #3

    echerub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    1,935
    Be aware also that kiri-gyutos tend to have shorter profile heights (heel height and all forward) compared to same-length regular gyutos. If you're riding your index finger on the spine, no problems, but you may find your hand riding a little low on a pinch grip when using the back half of the knife. Not all kiri-gyutos have this lower profile height, but many do.

    BTW, I find that yanagiba can give reliable paper-thin slices if the fish is of a firmer-fleshed type... which is when you'd want the really thin slices
    Len

  4. #4
    If you are looking for a single bevel kiritsuke they can be very heavy and the tip can be extremely delicate(a good one will cost a pretty penny). They are also very heavy and take some getting use to. With the Yanagi it just may need a professional single edge sharpening(luckily there are professional sharpeners and resources on this forum). You may need to invest in a higher quality Yanagiba or a Takohiki but i don't think anyone needs a Fugubiki unless they are actually preparing it(and that's a whole other story) Check out past threads for ideas and reach out to other members for advice.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    5
    Thank you all for the replies. I guess I cannot base liking a kiritsuke-style knife on liking the feel of a single one. It sounds like maybe the best course of action would be for me to get a gyuto knife now, and maybe in the future add a kiritsuke knife to my collection after I get all the primary pieces. With that said, which one of the gyuto selections would you recommend from either the list above or anything better? I think I currently am leaning to the Gesshin Ginga White #2 Wa-Gyuto 240mm.

    As for the Fuguhiki, I was recommended by a sushi chef, who I trained under for 6 months last year. I was able to cut 90% of the sashimi/nigiri with my yanagiba, but the ones that gave me problems were more the really soft flesh fish like snappers and trevally (which he served thin like fugu), and at some risk of ethical debate, shellfish like abalone, lobster, and geoduck that is served live.

    I wouldnt doubt that my yanagiba needs professional sharpening (Im 95% sure it does) or it simply may not be high quality. I am at the office now, but when I get home for lunch, maybe I can get a picture and see if you might be able to identify it. Thank you again.

  6. #6
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    3,469
    I'd stay away from "This Site Not Allowed Here" for purchases.

    Not sure if the Gesshin is in stock but it gets very good reviews and the vendor is top-notch.

    Cheers
    once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

  7. #7

    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by chinacats View Post
    I'd stay away from "This Site Not Allowed Here" for purchases.

    Not sure if the Gesshin is in stock but it gets very good reviews and the vendor is top-notch.

    Cheers
    Haha, I didnt notice that. It is from the Chef Knives To Go site, which I thought was considered reputable.

  8. #8
    daveb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Just outside Tampa
    Posts
    2,259
    Togo certainly has a reputation. Best left at that.
    Dave
    Older and wider.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    5
    Thank you all for your responses. Despite having my short list, I did more research on KKF and just ordered a Sakai Yusuke Swedish SS extra hardened/2.8mm 270mm Wa-Gyuto from Blueway Japan.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    'Peg City, Canada
    Posts
    234

    Gyuto Kiritsuke (double beveled) Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by echerub View Post
    Be aware also that kiri-gyutos tend to have shorter profile heights (heel height and all forward) compared to same-length regular gyutos. If you're riding your index finger on the spine, no problems, but you may find your hand riding a little low on a pinch grip when using the back half of the knife. Not all kiri-gyutos have this lower profile height, but many do.

    BTW, I find that yanagiba can give reliable paper-thin slices if the fish is of a firmer-fleshed type... which is when you'd want the really thin slices
    Like my custom Honyaki one from Watanabe (~58mm)

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ImageUploadedByKitchen Knife Forum1431482098.769443.jpg 
Views:	20 
Size:	15.3 KB 
ID:	27582

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •