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Thread: tamarind chopping blocks in Cambodia

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    tamarind chopping blocks in Cambodia

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    Just back from Cambodia. I found the mother load of tamarind chopping blocks in a Phnom Penh market but boy are those things heavy. No luck in bringing one home. The large sizes ran around $60-$80.

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    for those prices is that for the thin finished cutting boards or the logs beside them?

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    The thick chopping blocks on the right. I noticed yesterday that Amazon actually does have 12, 13, and 16-inch models straight from Thailand. The 16 will set you back around $250. I guess that is cheaper than flying to Thailand/Cambodia and trying to bring one home.

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    NS, which market did you find them at?

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    Senior Member Bromo33333's Avatar
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    A quick search revealed a source of 10.5" Tamarind cutting boards from Thai Imports in the US for <$50.

    LINK

    My wife has bought spices from them in the past, but I have no direct or indirect experience with them.

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    Orussey, forget the Russian or Central markets. And night markets are always just tourist junk. I know there are other small local markets around town but they are hard to find on maps.

    I have one of the Thai Imports 10.5's. It is too small to be useful in the kitchen for serious cooking. What I would really like is one of the 24-30-inch models used in the markets of Asia. But those probably weight a 100 pounds.

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    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
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    Most of the time... they are not air dried properly and very prone to cracking as they are still green.... IF a piece manage to reach you without cracks... best to oil it quickily and when it is slightly dry... oil it and keep it that way for a few months till it has stabilized with your moisture level in your climate zone..... Better still before shipment to you... oil it heavily and hopefully it survives the journey.

    Some wood.... will be most happy with a water bath often. Objective is to let it dry slowly. Too fast uneven drying .. uneven shrinkage and cracks.. still can be salvaged.. fill with with the wood dust after sandpapering with wood glue...

    Best to get a piece from a large tree without the pith and that even... not close to the pith at all. THis part will usually split slightly and its extra hard... and if you happen to get a piece near the root area... the wood grain patterns can be quite amazing...

    Have fun...

    rgds
    d

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    I know what you mean about cracking while drying. I have plenty of large red alder trees on my own land that could be used for a chopping blocks but I have never successfully dried a section. And I have used various sealants on the ends that are supposed to slow drying down and prevent that.
    I have a "iron wood" (no idea what that means in China) cutting board I brought back from China a number of years ago. The instruction with it was to soak it in salt water for a period of time and then allow to dry. So far it hasn't cracked.

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    Does Tamarind have any advantages over the usual board materials?

  10. #10
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    It is the universal and traditional choice in South East Asia and over there it comes in sizes suited to serious chopping. Finding good chopping as apposed to slicing and dicing boards is difficult in the U.S.

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