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Thread: Turning Chuck to Rib Eye

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by spoiledbroth View Post
    With respect how does salt yield a corned beef like colour, what I assume you must mean by appearance (or "temperature" for that matter)??

    Interesting post to say the least!
    When you salt meat before a long cook, the salt has enough time to denature the proteins to the point that we'd call it curing. Beef will take on the characteristics of corned beef because you're actually making corned beef. The degree to which this happens will depend on a lot of factors. In some cases you might not notice it. But it's generally best to avoid salting before long sous-vide cooking.


  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by rami_m View Post
    I am not sure what the pre cook adds to flavour or texture? Is it really worth the risk? Even if it's very low?
    The pre-cook does all the things that dry-aging does (besides concentrating flavors by desiccating the meat). But because of the higher temperature it works many orders of magnitude faster. It increases the tenderization by the same methods as aging, and it increases the level of dry-age kinds of flavors.

    And of course, it's completely optional. You'll get great results without it. I just don't think the risks are significant, if you're careful about pasteurizing the meat's surface first. I summarized the bacteriology in the article. Basically, at 40°C, eColi populations double every 30 minutes. Which means that over the course of four hours they'll multiply by 256 times. So if you start with a pasteurized surface, which means the original number of pathogens on the surface have been reduced by 6.5D (10 to the minus 6.5 power, or 0.0000003), the pathogen population is still less than 1/10,000 was it was when the meat went into the bag. This is overkill (literally) by many orders of magnitude.

    The dangers, however slight, aren't from pathogens directly, because any bacteria or virus will be killed by the cooking once you turn up the temperature. These long cooks always pasteurize the meat all the way through. Some bacteria, if the colonies become active enough, release heat-tolerant toxins that can make people very sick. I have never heard of this happening with a long sous-vide cook. The other issue is spoilage bacteria, which I address briefly in the blog. I have indeed heard of this problem showing up in the sous-vide bag, but always without a pre-pasteurization, and usually with some other funny business, like a long cook of meat that's been rolled (so there's contaminated surface on the inside, where it will take a long time to come to cooking temperature). The results of spoilage bacteria are disgusting but not life threatening.

    Questions I'm more interested in are how big a difference does the pre-cook make? And is there a more optimum time or temperature? I'd like to do these experiments, or convince someone else to do them. All i can say now is that science supports the general idea, and that the results are really good.


  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ynot1985 View Post
    great article.. the beer cooler sounds like an awesome ideal for a container that retains heat well.. was it easy to set up and mount in the cooler?
    It's really easy, provided you don't do what I did.

    I got a standard cooler with an uninsulated top, and decided to insulate it myself with spray-in urethane insulation. This was a terrible idea ... that insulation doesn't work properly in fully enclosed spaces, and I had to make a mess and jump through hoops and get scolded over the phone by a tech support lady with a chemistry PhD who may have threatened to hang up if I didn't promise to throw out the cooler and every piece of clothing I was wearing.

    So ... either leave the lid uninsulated (people on eGullet say this works just fine) or get a higher end cooler with an insulated lid.

    I made the cutout with a jig saw, and unscrewed the hinges, and that was that. For additional insulation and evaporation-slowing, you can cut out a piece of Reflectex (bubble wrap laminated with foil). This stuff works great on any S.V. container. I also got a little stainless steel rack sold by the Sous Vide Supreme people. Other people just buy a desk organizer rack at Staples and don't worry about it eventually rusting.

  4. #14
    Senior Member DamageInc's Avatar
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    Funny, Chefsteps just uploaded a video on how to turn a chuck roast into something resembling a prime rib roast.

    Don't drink out of ornamental ponds in Tiergarten. You will get sick.

  5. #15
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    I just did this and it turned out really well.

    A 1kg slab of wagyu brisket in the sous vide at 62 degrees for about 22 hours, then dried (paper towel) and put in a 250 degree oven for 15 odd minutes. Very tender, full of flavour. Sous vide juices reduced and used in a pinot noir (Bannockburn FWIW) jus.

    Even my 5yo (who does not like beef) asked for more.

    $18/kg instead of $60-80 for prime cuts of wagyu.

    Great idea. Thanks.
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  6. #16
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    I gave this a whirl with Costco chuck, so I guess that would be usda choice? I have to say it turned out pretty decent but it seemed more like medium to me. If I could get it to resemble medium rare I think this would be a real winner. Are my eyeballs lying to me?


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    Awesome write up! Have you had any issues with ziploc bags leaking during long cooks?

  8. #18
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    I've always used vacuum sealed bags. Can you use ziplock bags?
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  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nemo View Post
    I've always used vacuum sealed bags. Can you use ziplock bags?
    Definitely can use ziplocks for short duration. I've heard rumors of bags leaking during longer cooks, and I've heard of people double bagging, but I've only cooked something longer than five hours once.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by chobint View Post
    I gave this a whirl with Costco chuck, so I guess that would be usda choice? I have to say it turned out pretty decent but it seemed more like medium to me. If I could get it to resemble medium rare I think this would be a real winner. Are my eyeballs lying to me?
    You own the temp setting. I like 129F for myself, 131F for a crowd. With SV you don't get the bleeding mess with med rare so can go a skoosh lower temp. Your chuck looks like 135ish but hard to tell with camera/lighting playing a role.


    Quote Originally Posted by Nemo View Post
    I've always used vacuum sealed bags. Can you use ziplock bags?
    Ziplock style bags are useful if you don't own, don't want to own a sealer. Or sometimes if you want to seal liquids and all you have is a strip sealer. If you have a sealer then that is certainly the preferred alternative.

    I currently have 2# of utility grade ribeye in for a 20 hr cook. Hoping to find some way to make this thing fit to eat.

    Older and wider..

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