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Thread: It's Chili season - show your recipes

  1. #11
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    SpikeC's Avatar
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    The ATK recipe recommends making your own chili powder, not using grocery store brands.
    Spike C
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  2. #12
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    Yeah, I saw that, but back in 2005 they tested the store brands and picked the best one.

    k.
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  3. #13
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    So how about using pork instead of beef in chili? I do pork chili verde, but why not pork red?
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by SpikeC View Post
    So how about using pork instead of beef in chili? I do pork chili verde, but why not pork red?
    I've subbed pork loin for the chuck roast before and it works ok

    the pork tends to dry out if your not really careful

    I went with 4 hours on the crock pot and it was about right

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by StephanFowler View Post
    I've subbed pork loin for the chuck roast before and it works ok

    the pork tends to dry out if your not really careful

    I went with 4 hours on the crock pot and it was about right
    What about subbing pork loin for pork butt? Much higher internal fat content and won't dry out as much.

  6. #16

  7. #17
    Great recipes, I have never used Pork Butt, lol but almost always use some pork sausage!

    Im cooking a big pot of chili this weekend for the Get Together! Thanks for posting It gives me some new fresh ideas and will make this batch better!

    Inspired by God, Forged by Fire, Tempered by Water, Grounded by Earth, Guided by the spirit.. Randy Haas

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  8. #18
    Senior Member 9mmbhp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpikeC View Post
    So how about using pork instead of beef in chili? I do pork chili verde, but why not pork red?
    Carne Adovada - pork stewed with red chile - is very popular in New Mexico.


    One of the glories of New Mexican cuisine is carne adovada, that is, ‘adoboed meat’. The dish is really a variant of carne en chile colorado discussed hereabove. The sauce is just a simple version of the one described above,* in which one uses only dried red New Mexican chiles, some water, a healthy dose of garlic and perhaps some oregano. The meat used is pork (shoulder is a good cut), preferably not too fatty, cut into pieces, the size and form of which can vary according to personal taste, though in the versions I’ve had in (or from -- see below) New Mexico the pieces have been fairly small chunks. Crucial to this dish is the fact that the meat is marinated for a long time (at least overnight) in the red chile sauce; some extra garlic cloves can be added to the marinade. Actual cooking is done slowly in a not-too-hot oven (300-325º for several hours) and some people finish the dish briefly in a hot pan or under the broiler (e.g., Regina Romero). The finished product should be fairly ‘tight’, sufficiently so that it can serve as a not at all sloppy filling for a tortilla or burrito.


    * If one surveys a lot of recipes for this dish, one comes across versions in which the red chile sauce includes some flavourings beyond the chiles and garlic mentioned above; oregano is quite common and cumin is also a fairly common addition and there are yet others I’ve seen. But the best examples of this dish that I’ve had were, I firmly believe, maximally simple (and when we've made the dish, that's how we've done it). One such version, made on one of the Native American pueblos in New Mexico and brought to us (frozen) by a friend a couple of weeks ago was to my mind pretty much perfect. Red chiles of medium heat, garlic and pork. In a word: wow.

  9. #19
    Senior Member 9mmbhp's Avatar
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    I neglected to attribute the two paragraphs in my previous post, they come from the last post of this discussion (which is worth reading!).

  10. #20
    Senior Member wenus2's Avatar
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    interesting link 9mmbhp, thnx for sharing.
    -Enjoy the ride. *** All statements made herein are my personal opinion and nothing more, regardless of tone or context. ***

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