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Thread: Hydraulic press more dangerous than power hammer?

  1. #11
    Senior Member chefcomesback's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noah View Post
    Makes sense. Thank you.
    Pleasure, is there any makers near by you to visit ? You can see lots of things In person and it will make it easier for you to understand the process


  2. #12
    Senior Member Noah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chefcomesback View Post
    Pleasure, is there any makers near by you to visit ? You can see lots of things In person and it will make it easier for you to understand the process
    Yeah, I have a couple of friends who have said they'd introduce me to their maker friends in the near future. For now just doing some preliminary study and planning.


  3. #13

    HHH Knives's Avatar
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    Not sure what Murry was saying. BUT. I believe it may have more to do with the actual hydraulics themselves. The system is under emence pressure. and if faulty or not put together properly with the right components. Or if the components fail due to overheating from the forging process itself, etc. etc. etc. Many things that could go wrong.. It can and will hurt you more then getting you hand in the way of either a press or hammer. IMO. High Pressure hydro fluid cutting its way through flesh is a really bad thing. Really BAD

    Just my 2 cents. Take it for what its worth.

    I do agree with Chef that the footprint as much smaller. But if your goal is to forge finished blades. a hammer is a better tool. Both serve a purpose. and do there jobs well.
    Press is loud, But a different kind of loud then a hammer. SO if ya have neighbors. a hammer is probably not gona fly for long. lol

    Blessings and Good luck on your journey.
    Randy

    Inspired by God, Forged by Fire, Tempered by Water, Grounded by Earth, Guided by the spirit.. Randy Haas

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  4. #14
    Kippington's Avatar
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    I have the book somewhere and I was under the impression(!) Carter was talking about a blanking punch/punch cutters rather then the other slower presses.



    He mentions that you can lose a hand real quick in one of these and refuses to have one in his shop, choosing to use shears instead (shown at 8:20 in this next video)



    ----------------------

    Meanwhile, this is the hydraulic press that everyone in this thread is talking about:


  5. #15
    Senior Member Noah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kippington View Post
    I have the book somewhere and I was under the impression(!) Carter was talking about a blanking punch/punch cutters rather then the other slower presses.

    He mentions that you can lose a hand real quick in one of these and refuses to have one in his shop, choosing to use shears instead (shown at 8:20 in this next video)
    Not sure. I was under the impression he was talking about the sort blade smiths use for drawing out a billet, forge welding, etc., but I could have misunderstood. Here's the quote and the picture beside it:

    (from page 20) The really nasty machines: hydraulic and mechanical flywheel presses
    I don't use hydraulic or flywheel presses in my shop. They are excellent time savers and an incredibly efficient machine for industry but they MAIM FOR LIFE. Every severely deformed hand and finger of my bladesmithing brothers has been caused by these beasts. Not for me, thank you very much!


  6. #16

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    Its a mechanical press. That one is set up with a cold notching die. Think of it as an old fashioned Metalworker machine which you set up for one thing. They have a fast action due to the flywheel..These are used in Japan primarily for trimming, think cold shearing...to tweak the profile/tang. They are as safe or dangerous as you set them up to be. If used unguarded with bare finger holding the work, its an issue with heath and safety rather than the machine.
    However this type of press is nothing like a small Hydraulic forging press. You'll find plenty of examples of those on you tube. Ive been using hammers and hydraulic presses of various variety for 17 years, on the whole Ive had more moments with presses, but its always been when working cold, once I got my thumb stuck between a piece of 100mm square and the machine as the curve came up as I was working it, was a narrow escape, suffered just a bruise. Another time working on a 200 ton horizontal press a piece of the curving Jig backing plate exploded, it tuned out the plate I used was hardened steel fortunately no one was injured. So presses can surprise you more, the pressures can be huge and you need to be aware of what your doing, but as I say this was cold work in large 100mm plus square sections......Never had any issues regarding forging /punching holes or any other type of hot work you might use a press for. With hammers the dangers are more obvious and dictate clear guide lines.....Never change the dies with the hammer running and unchocked ram, always use tongs or an extension bar, be very aware of what your doing if you use special tooling in the hammer and when you do make it for purpose, don't just hold a bar in there as a fuller etc etc etc..... And of course wear you gear glasses and ear protection.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Noah's Avatar
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    Thanks for the clarification and the tips.

    I'll certainly do what I can to create and maintain a safe working space. I'm rather fond of my limbs, and generally prefer to keep the majority of my blood where it belongs...

  8. #18
    Senior Member jessf's Avatar
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    A buffing wheel is likely the most commonly dangerous tool in my shop. Wear a proper 3m mask too. I do this all the time even if im doing nothing that i think creates dust.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Noah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jessf View Post
    A buffing wheel is likely the most commonly dangerous tool in my shop. Wear a proper 3m mask too. I do this all the time even if im doing nothing that i think creates dust.
    Sounds like a good policy. I've had the misfortune of inhaling a bit of dust from the same building as a metal-shop a couple of times when it got stirred up unexpectedly and I didn't have a mask on. Not fun.


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