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Thread: Good Knife-Related Metallurgy Resources?

  1. #11
    Senior Member Noah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WillC View Post
    You won't, other than snippets of wisdom on certain materials. You need to read Verhoeven it's a properly written guide to heat treatments written especially for bladesmiths.
    http://www.hybridburners.com/documents/verhoeven.pdf
    Build a quick forge and make a few knives as your reading it, knifemaking is a doing type of thing.
    Sounds like a plan. Thanks for the advice.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Noah's Avatar
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    Unfortunately I am going to have to practice a little patience for a while though. I have access to a metal shop, and building a small forge seems very doable from videos I've watched, but I don't have an anvil yet, and I'm primarily interested in forging rather than stock removal.

    Need to hit the local scrap yards sometime soon. See if I can find something workable to get started with.

    That's part of the reason I've been distracting myself a bit by studying up on theory and techniques. Time will come....soon.

  3. #13
    Senior Member bkultra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noah View Post
    I'm not finding any books or videos by Larrin Thomas, though I did find a linkedin profile. Does he have some available form of media about metallurgy that I'm missing, or....?
    User name on most forums is Larrin. He is one of Devin's son's. He has a masters in materials science and a PhD in metallurgy. His posts are worth seeking out. He is one of the people I miss most on this forum. He shared a lot of knowledge with us and I'm forever grateful.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Noah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkultra View Post
    User name on most forums is Larrin. He is one of Devin's son's. He has a masters in materials science and a PhD in metallurgy. His posts are worth seeking out. He is one of the people I miss most on this forum. He shared a lot of knowledge with us and I'm forever grateful.
    Ah, thanks for the clarification. I'll be sure to seek his posts out as I learn.

  5. #15
    Senior Member milkbaby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noah View Post
    Unfortunately I am going to have to practice a little patience for a while though. I have access to a metal shop, and building a small forge seems very doable from videos I've watched, but I don't have an anvil yet, and I'm primarily interested in forging rather than stock removal.

    Need to hit the local scrap yards sometime soon. See if I can find something workable to get started with.

    That's part of the reason I've been distracting myself a bit by studying up on theory and techniques. Time will come....soon.
    Definitely read Verhoeven as he explains all the science instead of forums where you can often get a do-it-this-way recipe (which may not always be correct).

    Also don't knock stock removal as a way to get started. I'm working on my own knives #3, 4, and 5 right now, all stock removal only so far, but I'm learning a LOT by DOING as WillC mentioned. Designing, prototyping, bevel grinding, heat treat, tempering, and handle construction are all things you can learn and gain experience doing on stock removal knives that will be applicable to forged knives. Also, forged knives will also require stock removal unless you're only planning on making some caveman sort of blunt force hacking ax.

    It's easy to make something quite usable, hard to make something superb. It's a lot of fun though!

  6. #16
    Senior Member Noah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by milkbaby View Post
    Definitely read Verhoeven as he explains all the science instead of forums where you can often get a do-it-this-way recipe (which may not always be correct).
    Indeed, the reading in his book I've done so far seems like it's very well done and makes things quite understandable.

    Quote Originally Posted by milkbaby View Post
    Also don't knock stock removal as a way to get started. I'm working on my own knives #3, 4, and 5 right now, all stock removal only so far, but I'm learning a LOT by DOING as WillC mentioned. Designing, prototyping, bevel grinding, heat treat, tempering, and handle construction are all things you can learn and gain experience doing on stock removal knives that will be applicable to forged knives. Also, forged knives will also require stock removal unless you're only planning on making some caveman sort of blunt force hacking ax.

    It's easy to make something quite usable, hard to make something superb. It's a lot of fun though!
    Yeah good points. I shouldn't let my fascination with forging delay getting my feet wet while I acquire the tools needed to do things the way I really want to.

    Sorta wanted my first knife to be one I forged myself. But I guess that can wait...

  7. #17
    Senior Member Kippington's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WillC View Post
    Build a quick forge and make a few knives as your reading it, knifemaking is a doing type of thing.
    This.

    Studying papers and watching videos is one thing, but to hold a piece of steel yourself and watch/feel it subtly change right in front of your eyes is something else entirely.

    https://youtu.be/4x0f2b_0kn0?t=6m17s

  8. #18
    Senior Member Noah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kippington View Post
    This.

    Studying papers and watching videos is one thing, but to hold a piece of steel yourself and watch/feel it subtly change right in front of your eyes is something else entirely.

    https://youtu.be/4x0f2b_0kn0?t=6m17s
    Yup, I hear ya folks. Thanks for the encouragement and good advice.

    I do tend to be a theory-first sort of learner, but I also know that can't replace the value of hands-on experience.

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