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Thread: Edge Pro Apex?

  1. #1

    Edge Pro Apex?

    I am a home cook, but with some high end knives (Nenox, Konosuke, Carter, and a couple Shun) and am looking for a sharpening set. Since I don't have much of any experience sharpening my knives I was looking at the Edge Pro Apex set. I've used spiderco sharpmaket in the past with some success.

    What do the experts here think of the edge pro system, also saw they offer shapton stones for it, is it worth upgrading to shapton? Not sure which model edge pro to get, the lower end one only has 2 stones, the top one seems overkill but the cost difference pushes me toward adge pro apex 4.

    Any advice would be helpful
    Thanks and happy holidays!


  2. #2
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    If that is your option, I would suggest sending off your nice knives instead of ruining the geometry with an ep.

    Buy a sharpening stone and watch these...all you'll ever need.

    once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

  3. #3
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    Most people don`t know how to sharpen freehand, so no worry you will not destroy geomtry with EP, but! there is nearly no advantage in using systems like this, you can get nearly the same from china (EP Style Sharpeners) for about 25 Dollar.

    Pro:
    With some skills and the EP System (proper stones needed especially with the cheap chinese model!) it is nearly foolprove sharpening! compared to hand sharpening.


    Cons:
    Edge retention with same sharpness is only about 10% higher then a pro handsharpener can reach......
    You can not thin your blade (that is only bad if you damage the knife, i thin my knives about 1-2 times a year! (in pro business!).
    Original EP is much overpriced!

    Search Youtube for Bogdan Manko, he makes the world best sharpening systems, that can do (even with benchstones) the best possible edges, sharper then any razor on the market, that outlast every hand sharpening attempt by miles!

    Greets Sebastian.

  4. #4
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    that's nonsense...when you sharpen the first few times all will be great but in addition to not keeping equal angle on entire edge, the knife won't get thinned and eventually it will be sharp as hell and cut like ****. but go for it...and eventually like most everyone else that's been through the same you'll wind up getting a stone and just figuring it out for yourself...good luck
    once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinacats View Post
    that's nonsense...when you sharpen the first few times all will be great but in addition to not keeping equal angle on entire edge, the knife won't get thinned and eventually it will be sharp as hell and cut like ****. but go for it...and eventually like most everyone else that's been through the same you'll wind up getting a stone and just figuring it out for yourself...good luck
    Please excuse my bad english!

    Knife thinning for me with at least 15 years of hand sharpening experience is only necessary after about 10000 meals cooked and cut..... (as mentioned above....). I have only used Chosera 5k for touchups (this is the grid the handsharpening sence has its end), daily.

    If you start sharpening with 1000 grit or below, you may need thinning after two or three sessions, that is the main point. This can`t be done with jigs like EP, you are completely right.

    For homecooking and a pro sharpener, with maybe Jnat Awesado touchups you wouln`T need thinning for years....... And i like a laser cut!
    Not all about sharpness!

    Now i use Bogdan`s Skorpion Benchstone Sharpening System, and my knifes (1.2562 alloy, high tungsten) cut for about 300-1000 dishes with razor like sharpness (far beyond Chosera 5k).
    So for homeuse this will be the solution! And you can always thin your knives if you like! Cause i am using Benchstones......

    This system just guides your strokes on the stone, constant angle and pressure control.

    You can always send me a knife i will sharpen it for you, and you will have a whole new cutting experience!

    Greets Sebastian.

  6. #6

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    I have the apex and it works fine. You use a black marker on the bevel to find the right angle or at least the angle your knife at least the time. it take practice and skill to learn to use it though since you have to set it up right hold your knife in place right and move the knife and then do it left handed. free hand is fine too they both take skill. my hands are not accurate enough now to freehand. there is no magical thing about sharpening all it is is keeping accurate angle and rough through the grits. choosing the right angle and the right grit for the job is the key. maintaining the angle is the had part.

  7. #7
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    Puff, Use of an Edge Pro (or similar gizmo) is at the least polarizing in the knife world. And for the most part members of this forum prefer sharpening free hand with Japanese water stones.


    I was interested in an Edge Pro when I started my obsession with good, sharp, knives. Was nudged towards learning free hand (here) and have never looked back. It's a relatively easy skill to become proficient with though difficult if not impossible one to master. I like being able to literally go into any kitchen, be presented with an unknown knife and an unknown stone and to make it sharper than it was before I started. Kind of cool to have in your bag of tricks.

    Some find it relaxing and on occasion I do. Natural stones or soakers work well. Sometimes I just need a knife sharp now and do a quick and dirty with a splash and go. Either way the result is a uniformly sharp knife that's been thinned as I sharpen.

    The Gizmos have never been able to address thinning behind the edge or uniformly sharpening the blade. A knife that is not routinely thinned quickly becomes a fatty that results in a sharp knife that does not cut well. And the blade is not straight but the gizmo is. Effective sharpening means adjusting the angle of sharpening at the tip at least, some adjust for more robust heels as well.

    The gizmos certainly have their advocates, many of them long term advocates. You just won't find many here.
    Older and wider..

  8. #8
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    I talk about systems like this.....

    And you can always let the system go, and thin your blades manually, but it would be possible with this system too, i can sharpen 0 degree angle with it, no problems..... Even Yanagibas get a new level of sharpness...... Because the Angle control is much better then with EP Systems and i got a pressure control as well....

    Btw. Sorry for so much offtopic.......

    Greets Sebastian.

  9. #9
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    Jigs are sort of like training wheels on a bicycle. They make it easy to ride and get to where you are going but there are limitations, cornering fast being one (thinning a knife for better cutting in the case of Edgepro). You will also discover other bicyclists politely trying not to snicker when they see you go by. I started with the Edgepro Apex. I sold it once I learned to freehand. Do a thread search on the Edgepro and you will find all this has been hashed out before. It would also be pretty awkward to try to maintain a Japanese single bevel knife with an EdgePro if you're ever interested in single bevels.

  10. #10

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    I went from freehand Sharpening thousands of plane irons to now the edge pro because my hands are not great and I don't sharpen often. maybe once a month for the most part. so it is hard to get back to free hand when you do it so seldom. I wore out many a 1000 grit water stones one a month I think. I used to have three makita horizontal sharpeners ( gave up on the stone wheels because I wore too many out) and went to sandpaper on a flat disc. and shapton hippo stones that were huge that they no longer made. I was able to sharped a rough ground blade from heat treating to sharp in about 2.5 minutes. but it was hard on my hands and really wanted something else after so many years. I have never had to sharpen a knife to where it needs thinned yet.
    all sharpening setups have good and bad points and you just need to choose what will work for you.


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