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Dremel for rounding choils and spines?
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Thread: Dremel for rounding choils and spines?

  1. #1
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    deanb's Avatar
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    Dremel for rounding choils and spines?

    I have a couple very hard (RC 64-66) knives that need their choils and spines rounded. I bought a Dremel today for that purpose. Any tips would be very much appreciated.
    It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt.

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  4. #4
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    I'd suggest trying your luck on a beater knife, one that you don't mind messing up. Dremels are difficult to use without occasional minor loss of control.

    I would have chosen to use files and sandpaper, or a 1 x 30 belt sander.
    “Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”

  5. #5
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
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    own one.. lack of control over such a long surface. I always prefer sandpaper where I have granular control ( By hand) and choose the appropriate grit for the task.

    have fun..

    rgds d

  6. #6
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    If you have a variable speed, start slow. Also it would be wise to have a vise with some padding in between the blade to properly secure the blade without scratching it. Use both hands and start on the handle side. As you get towards the blade, it gets easier to slip. I would only go half way up the blade and finish the rest with some rasp or files. BTW, I cut myself very nasty when I was not carefull around the heel. Just be careful.

  7. #7

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    I have tried the dremel route twice, and screwed up twice. I would say put the blade in a phonebook, put on a good movie and go to work with some sandpaper.

  8. #8
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    I tried this last week on a beater I found in my garage, it now has a nice big swirl scratched into the face. If you care about the appearance of the knife at all you should do the phone book and sand paper method.

  9. #9
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    you should be able to get good results if you can mask off the areas you don't want affected with a durable material. a few layers of duct tape would probably do the job, as you only need to prevent brief contacts.

  10. #10
    I've had success making the dremel stationary and and moving the knife. Keep in mind, you MUST tape the edge, if you want to keep your flesh intact.

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