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Thread: Polishing finish definitions+photo examples thread

  1. #11
    Senior Member Kingkor's Avatar
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    I don't want to hijack the tread but I have a more genral question about polishing knives, when you go through the stone progression you just lay the knife flat and start working on it on the stone just like sharpening? Do you change directions of the blade to change the direction of the scratch marks? When and why in the process do you use finger stones?

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kingkor View Post
    I don't want to hijack the tread but I have a more genral question about polishing knives, when you go through the stone progression you just lay the knife flat and start working on it on the stone just like sharpening? Do you change directions of the blade to change the direction of the scratch marks? When and why in the process do you use finger stones?
    Ideally, with the compound geometry knives with a distinct bevel and flat, yes you lie the blade flat on the stone. Alternating directions is a good idea, but I don't do it all the time and the contortion it can force might be counterproductive sometimes. Fingerstones are best used when the effective geometry is set and most of the scratches are gone. Depending on the kind of stones, you may want to have the edge steel at a high finish before jumping to fingerstones. They will, by virtue of their small surface area, conform more easily to the bevel surface and produce a finish with generally fewer streaks and sometimes a stronger contrast between cladding and core.

  3. #13
    Senior Member zetieum's Avatar
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    Disclaimer: I am in no way an expert, I just want to share because I find the discussion interesting.

    Here are some pic of a TF nakiri that I thinned some time ago. I did more or less the following:
    400 atoma + thai natural coarse (~600?) + 1000 JNS + natural Binsu + Khao Men + Unknown Suita + kitta finger stones (from JNS).

    I did not alternate the direction on the of the scratches: they were always at 45 deg. Knife was flat on the bevel and I tried to convex a bit.




  4. #14
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    Sorry for my earlier grammar mistakes (lie/lay, &c.).
    Quote Originally Posted by labor of love View Post
    Even though I've been a jknife dork for several years now I've never been able to grasp a basic 101 of polishing. About 3 years ago I picked up a king 800 and have found it to be a great starting point(and super easy to use).... But if I'm being honest I'm not quite sure what people mean when they say things like "frosted","hazy" or even "Kasumi"finish. Maybe this would be a good sticky maybe not. Either way, I wanted to ask fellow members with polishing experience if they could post examples of different polishing finishes(photos to demonstrate) so I could visually understand the terminology better.
    Thanks guys!
    I think other guys have the photos down as well as anything I can show, but to waste a few words and repost a couple pics...

    The idea behind kasumi (霞 mist) is that the linear base scratch pattern is obscured by a finer layer of shallow, short random scratches or other textures (such as pitting or dimples) that scatter light.

    The vernacular just describes the visual impression relative to perhaps effects on glass.
    For example, some finishes have a coarse crystalline appearance reminiscent of frost. This is more likely to be attributed to cheaper finishes like coarse blasting. It is especially obvious in its strong contrast with the semi-mirror edge.


    "Misty", to me, is pretty general for anything in this class of finish, but I would probably use it in English to describe a lighter, lower-contrast finish without a very mirrored edge:

    Or like the nakiri I posted in another thread:


    Hazy seems to suggest a lighter, maybe semi-mirror finish, but then it is just my impression from the word.

    In my opinion, these words do not focus on the darker contrasty finish produced by the King 800 or similar.

    (sorry old pic)

    Which is almost certainly included in the broad descriptions like misty or kasumi.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Badgertooth's Avatar
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    Could we get some more shots of the Carter you refinished please Xoomg?

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badgertooth View Post
    Could we get some more shots of the Carter you refinished please Xoomg?
    The finish that was in the above pic was an early test and the knife went through a few more varied polishes with coticule, synthetics, and other stuff before I sold it. When I sold it, I only took a few pics and it was in only a decent working polish, so probably not worth sharing here when you guys have more interesting knives in more interesting polishes.

  7. #17
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by XooMG View Post
    Sorry for my earlier grammar mistakes (lie/lay, &c.).

    I think other guys have the photos down as well as anything I can show, but to waste a few words and repost a couple pics...

    The idea behind kasumi (霞 mist) is that the linear base scratch pattern is obscured by a finer layer of shallow, short random scratches or other textures (such as pitting or dimples) that scatter light.

    The vernacular just describes the visual impression relative to perhaps effects on glass.
    For example, some finishes have a coarse crystalline appearance reminiscent of frost. This is more likely to be attributed to cheaper finishes like coarse blasting. It is especially obvious in its strong contrast with the semi-mirror edge.


    "Misty", to me, is pretty general for anything in this class of finish, but I would probably use it in English to describe a lighter, lower-contrast finish without a very mirrored edge:

    Or like the nakiri I posted in another thread:


    Hazy seems to suggest a lighter, maybe semi-mirror finish, but then it is just my impression from the word.

    In my opinion, these words do not focus on the darker contrasty finish produced by the King 800 or similar.

    (sorry old pic)

    Which is almost certainly included in the broad descriptions like misty or kasumi.
    Thank you very much for the input.

  8. #18
    Senior Member TheCaptain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by XooMG View Post
    The finish that was in the above pic was an early test and the knife went through a few more varied polishes with coticule, synthetics, and other stuff before I sold it. When I sold it, I only took a few pics and it was in only a decent working polish, so probably not worth sharing here when you guys have more interesting knives in more interesting polishes.
    I think anything which shows different progressions, especially if incomplete, has value. We're learning...

    (In other words, nope - I disagree - more pictures please!)

  9. #19
    Senior Member bryan03's Avatar
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    after hakka and finger stones

  10. #20
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    I believe this was after a coticule:


    This was my first effort on white suita:

    (some reflections and finger smudges visible)

    And an earlier one with JNS 300:


    So not very interesting, sorry.

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