Quantcast
Cheap way to get rid of scratches on knife?
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Cheap way to get rid of scratches on knife?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    695

    Cheap way to get rid of scratches on knife?

    I have a lot of time on my hands now...I'd like to get rid of some scuff marks from my not-so-good-sharpening.

    Now "a lot of time on my hands" also means "not much money to spend". What are the most cost-effective ways of doing this? Also say if money wasn't a concern...what would you use?

  2. #2
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,090
    Can't go wrong with progressive grits of wet/dry sandpaper and a soft sanding block to help maintain the contours of your grind. If money was no concern... I'd have someone else do it.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    695
    Whats the difference between wet/dry sandpaper? Just how you use it or is there a difference in the actual product?

    And what grits would you use?

    Sorry for the dumb questions I don't do much of this stuff

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    342
    Quote Originally Posted by Vertigo View Post
    Can't go wrong with progressive grits of wet/dry sandpaper and a soft sanding block to help maintain the contours of your grind. If money was no concern... I'd have someone else do it.
    I agree, I would buy several types since the best looking IMO leaves a finish similar to the DMT plates, some leave a matte finish and that may be your thing so experiment. Wet/Dry just means that wet can get wet and not fall apart, usually the grit is better bonded too. The regular type once wet starts loosing grit fast. I think emery is the finish I like the best.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Rockport, TX
    Posts
    4,892
    It's easier to find higher grits of wet/dry and the paper lasts longer. Plus it puts up with being lubricated, which is a real plus when polishing. You can use 3M Wet/Dry up to ~800grit with a little mineral oil and strokes all in the same direction and make a nice haze. Or you can get up to 2500grit and polish it like a mirror, which I don't recommend.

  6. #6
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,090
    Quote Originally Posted by slowtyper View Post
    Whats the difference between wet/dry sandpaper? Just how you use it or is there a difference in the actual product?

    And what grits would you use?

    Sorry for the dumb questions I don't do much of this stuff
    Some sandpapers not specifically marked as "wet" or waterproof use bonding agents which dissolve in water. I really don't think water or other lubrication is totally necessary for working on knives, but I like that it keeps the various particulates from going airborne (which means I don't need to wear a mask when working on a knife for a few hours).

    What grit you start at depends on how deep the scratches you'll be working on are. When I polish a house knife from work, that's completely bunged up from years of abuse, I start at #120. For my own knives, usually #400 or so.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    1,863
    Sandpaper uses to wear or soften quite quickly. So you may use the used 240-paper to get a smooth finish. You may add some stone mud and vary with different stones...
    Be sure to keep a respectable distance to the edge, or you will have to build it up entirely.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    695
    Thanks all. I assume since each grit leaves a different finish, I have to sand down the entire knife to get it to look even, can't just do a small affected section?

  9. #9
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    1,863
    Exactly, but once you've found a good mix of sandpaper, mud, pressure, and forget about a polished but sticking blade, you will be very happy!

  10. #10
    Delbert Ealy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Indian River, MI Just under The Bridge
    Posts
    962
    I would start with some 3m wet/dry 400grit and a can of wd-40 or other lube. back with a solid block and use a good back and forth motion until your scratches are gone. To even up the scratch pattern start with a new piece of sandpaper and fresh lube and starting at the bolster use smooth even strokes all the way to the tip.
    You should be able to do this in less than an hour for the whole knife.
    Del

    Small can of wd-40 $2
    4 sheets of sandpaper $4
    Total $6

    Laminated metals specialist, Kitchen knife and gadget maker
    www.ealyknives.com
    www.mokume-jewelry.net
    "Build a man a fire and he will be warm for a day, set a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life"

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts