Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 33

Thread: The best supplement for my Takeda AS Gyuto 240?

  1. #11
    Senior Member milkbaby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    514
    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...aly-Line-Knife

    It's by a western knifemaker, Delbert Ealy. My bad though, it's AEB-L high carbon stainless though (I think originally developed for razors), not the low chromium carbon steel you mentioned being interested in.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Posts
    79
    I just looked up AEB-L and it sounds interesting. The only reason why I prefer carbon steel is because of the edge retention, and the ease of sharpening.

    I like the shape of it, so if AEB-L share the same benefits, then it might be my new life long companion :-).

  3. #13
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    dirty south, louisiana
    Posts
    3,778
    I don't mean to piss in anyone's Cheerios here, but I've never found AEB-L to be carbon like. Certain jmakers that work w Swedish stainless have been able to produce some nice steel compared to most other stainless steel, but if carbon is what you like and are used to I would stick with it if I were you. 13% chromium will behave like 13% chromium.

  4. #14
    Senior Member panda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    south east florida
    Posts
    3,434
    Suggesting stainless to someone that wants carbon. what about a diamond honing steel to go with it?

    For a contrast to Takeda but shorter, try a munetoshi 210 gyuto. It is reactive but as long as you wipe and keep dry it's not a problem.

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Involves Germans. Lots of Germans.
    Posts
    1,779
    I find SOME petties come with exactly enough knuckle clearance to get by if correctly pinched -or even more than that. Best to try And tall, short knives like a ko-santoku or kawamuki (while I do love them) trade knuckle clearance against tunnel grip clearance (harder to work under your hand).

    @labor of love edge retention wise, or thinness/acuteness potential wise?

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Posts
    79
    The Munetoshis looks very interesting too - a bit like the takedas with a more rough finish.

    I can also see that there is a lot of Shigs being sold on the forum at affordable prices, and that I just missed a 180 Gyuto.

    I might have a look at the BST forum to see if there is a knife showing up there, that could be interesting.

    Would you prefer the Munetoshis to the Toyamas, or are they completely different knifes?

  7. #17

    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    17
    I have a kochi 180mm kiritsuke shaped santoku. https://www.japaneseknifeimports.com...shaped-santoku and it is a great knife. Honestly, I find myself grabbing it more often than either of my 240mm gyutos. It is laser sharp, can be used for some tip work (it would be awkward to use it for hand work, but not as awkward as a 240mm gyuto).

    if you are just looking for a petty, I have loved my watanabe 150mm petty (pro line). Its just a great knife and basically indestructible.

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Posts
    79
    I have only heard good things about the Kochi knives, and the kiritsuke shaped santoku looks like a good shape for a small allround knife. I think it looks a bit bulky though, but for me it's always hard to judge before having it in my hand using it. For me it's also a question of being used to a knife. In the beginning I thought my 240 gyuto was way too big, but today I am more than happy that I went for that size.

  9. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Chandler AZ
    Posts
    106
    Quote Originally Posted by nkbitsch View Post
    Thank you so much for your replies!

    I'm thinking of using it for tasks where i feel that the 240 gyuto is a bit to big. An example could be parting up a chicken or slicing up a mango or an avocado.

    Knuckle clearance is not deadly important for the tasks I will be using it for, but I always feel it a bit annoying when it isn't there. Another alternative might be a smaller gyuto?
    I use my Tadatsuna 180mm White #2 petty for all of those tasks; it feels a little long sometimes, a 150mm petty would do fine. A honesuki is supposed to be the ideal weapon for parting and boning a chicken, and it will have knuckle clearance for you. You could probably get it to slice a mango or avocado too.

  10. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Sf bay area
    Posts
    120
    Quote Originally Posted by CompE View Post
    I use my Tadatsuna 180mm White #2 petty for all of those tasks; it feels a little long sometimes, a 150mm petty would do fine. A honesuki is supposed to be the ideal weapon for parting and boning a chicken, and it will have knuckle clearance for you. You could probably get it to slice a mango or avocado too.
    Couldn't agree more with this. A 150 petty is a great go to size for many tasks. For chicken, try a honesuki- it feels so natural and it's a pleasure to use.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •