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Thread: Supplemental Jnat finisher

  1. #21
    Senior Member Mute-on's Avatar
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    I don't have a Binsui to answer that difinitively.

    The Ohira Suita cuts very fast for its hardness/fineness due to the Su (holes). However, the scratch pattern it leaves is very fine and MAY not erase the deeper scratches from a Binsui. An intermediate stone such as an aoto or equivalent MAY be required.

    Comments on a full Jnat progression are in the JNAT Club thread, amongst other places on the forum.

    Cheers

    J


  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by foody518 View Post
    Do you feel the Ohira Suita can completely bridge the gap from something like Binsui?
    isn't binsui meant to be really coarse? my gut feeling would say no


  3. #23
    Senior Member foody518's Avatar
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    My understanding of the thrust of the initial post was to find something to bridge the gap from Naka-to to a harder Jnat finisher for knives. Question was trying to dig at whether Ohira Suita is capable of being more of filling in the existing gap and taking out that coarse scratch pattern, or if it is closer to the existing finisher

    Quote Originally Posted by ynot1985 View Post
    isn't binsui meant to be really coarse? my gut feeling would say no
    Not quite the same, but my Thai white Binsui I would guesstimate is somewhere in the 1.5-2k range.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by foody518 View Post
    My understanding of the thrust of the initial post was to find something to bridge the gap from Naka-to to a harder Jnat finisher for knives. Question was trying to dig at whether Ohira Suita is capable of being more of filling in the existing gap and taking out that coarse scratch pattern, or if it is closer to the existing finisher


    Not quite the same, but my Thai white Binsui I would guesstimate is somewhere in the 1.5-2k range.
    ah right.. I thought u meant Japanese Binsui

  5. #25
    Senior Member foody518's Avatar
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    @ynot1985 I would not be surprised if they are similar to the Japanese stones referred to as Binsui from Amakusa

  6. #26
    Senior Member Badgertooth's Avatar
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    A bit late to this, sorry. Aizu is about the only thing that I can think of to plug the gap that isn't a mudfest. And it does it very well. I was thinking Aiiwatani but that would finish as fine or finer than the yaginoshima, they're soft but not midgrit or prefinish at all. Ohira strikes me as too fine to bridge that gap and too close to the yaginoshima. You could go full left field and be the first on the forum write up a stone called an inutaba. These finish 3 - 4k and are not especially muddy. Finding one is another story.

  7. #27
    Senior Member jklip13's Avatar
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    Koma can take you from 1k to a hard Suita in not too much time
    A good knives wont make you better, only practice will, a good knife should make you practice.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badgertooth View Post
    A bit late to this, sorry. Aizu is about the only thing that I can think of to plug the gap that isn't a mudfest. And it does it very well. I was thinking Aiiwatani but that would finish as fine or finer than the yaginoshima, they're soft but not midgrit or prefinish at all. Ohira strikes me as too fine to bridge that gap and too close to the yaginoshima. You could go full left field and be the first on the forum write up a stone called an inutaba. These finish 3 - 4k and are not especially muddy. Finding one is another story.
    Maybe I misrepresented what I wanted. I am not so much looking for something to bridge the gap, rather something to use instead of the Yaginoshima. I just meant that it was okay if it finished a little coarser than the Yaginoshima.

    We just took the conversation a different direction.

  9. #29

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    Going back to the Khao Men, you could use it wet to the point where mud development is inhibited and get a very even, working edge with quite a bit of bite. Mine is harder and less muddy than my hideriyama and using it wet with light pressure actually polishes okay

  10. #30
    Senior Member Badgertooth's Avatar
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    You're on the right track with Ohira awasedo then and mizukihara is also a great option along those lines. And softer Aiiwatani then becomes a great choice too. But you'd still a need some sort of stepping stone from binsu or Ikarashi up to that alternate finisher.


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