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Thread: what is your standard cooking oil?

  1. #21
    Senior Member bkultra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by guari View Post
    Wow. I'm even more perplexed now. Even less sure what to use now. Is there a pdf or a website that explains all of this?

    Thanks


    https://www.centurylife.org/whats-th...t-cooking-oil/

  2. #22
    Senior Member spoiledbroth's Avatar
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    So when we talk about prolonged heat load... Hours isn't really a realistic frying time. The few studies I have seen on this the oils were heated over 2-5 hour period. Perhaps some application for commercial fryers but ... At home I wouldn't be concerned
    Blue skies over bad lands

  3. #23
    EVOO for dressings. Coconut oil, ghee or rendered bacon fat for cooking (depending on what I'm cooking) and peanut oil for frying. Ocacasionally safflower for homemade mayo.

    I never touch non-food items like canola, "vegetable oil", corn oil, soybean oil and the like

  4. #24
    Senior Member zetieum's Avatar
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    Olive oil for almost everything. I buy 30L once a year in while to a producer in south of France that I like.
    Sunflower oil for mayo
    peanut oil when deep frying and for the any recipse that my grand-mother used to do: she came from Algeria and made everything with peanut oil.
    Butter for certain ingredient that are so much better in butter, and for recipe requiring dark butter.
    duck fat when I want that taste (potatoes for instance).
    sesame oil for the taste when I cook asian style food.

  5. #25
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    @spoiledbroth given that ...


    ... some canola brands start to smell rather unpleasant even when just sauteeing...

    ... the oil for your deep fryer or frying pot or chip pan might easily clock in a few hours total...

    ... we all probably laugh at "do not heat over a 180°C" when there is a culinary reason to go higher....

    ... no one wants unnecessary rancid (burnt/pyrolized/oxidised) oil in their food without a good reason

    I would say it is perfectly relevant to home cooking as well.


    By smoke point, refined safflower, soybean and avocado oil should be the most heat stable. The last one is too expensive to fry with, the others... let's say your nose tells you a different story...

  6. #26
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    I mostly use safflower oil, unless I'm looking for the flavor of olive oil. Very high smoke point, and no discernible flavor. It's also ideal for seasoning steel and iron pan surfaces, with it's high unsaturated fat content.

    There are a few other oils I'd use just as happily, but where I live (NYC) safflower is usually the cheapest option. I understand that this can vary a bit regionally.

    Re: canola oil smelling bad ... I've experienced this, with some canola oils but not others. An unpleasant fishy smell. Maybe it has to do with the level of refinement. FWIW, when I staged at a Michelin 3-star seafood restaurant, they sautéed all the fish in canola oil. They had gallon cans of it piled high on wire shelves. I don't remember what brand.

  7. #27
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    @paulraphael fishy smell, exactly what I was thinking about.

  8. #28
    Senior Member guari's Avatar
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    Felt compelled to go ahead and order 4 litres of refined Avocado Oil. I didn't know sunflower didn't live up to high temps.

    Good thread.

  9. #29

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    Used to be grapeseed for neutral, and ovoo (but not a high end one) for everything else. These days's I've been using a lot more coconut oil, as I've been getting more into Thai curries. Whatever I cook, it's usually coconut oil that I use for coating steel/iron pans after washing.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by woyuskinny View Post
    Used to be grapeseed for neutral, and ovoo (but not a high end one) for everything else. These days's I've been using a lot more coconut oil, as I've been getting more into Thai curries. Whatever I cook, it's usually coconut oil that I use for coating steel/iron pans after washing.
    I'm not saying it isn't used but I've never found coconut oil common in Thai curries. Most places I've been in Asia, Thailand, China, Viet Nam, like to use corn or soybean oil because its cheap. And cheap tends to rule the day.

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