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Thread: what is your standard cooking oil?

  1. #31
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    Peanut oil for deep frying and stir frying, butter for eggs. Can't stand "canola" rapeseed oil due to the slightly fishy smell (must be that omega whatever compounds). Don't mind using olive oil but its pretty expensive. I can even taste the soybean oil in some mayo. Tried coconut but for some reason didn't like it. I guess the taste doesn't go with the other food I'm cooking it with. I don't think there are perfectly neutral oils and it's how the oil tastes in conjunction with the ingredients and what you are used to tasting that determines your preferences for cooking oil.


  2. #32
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    Canola =/= rapeseed to clarify.

    And on behalf of all Manitobans I apologise -_- were responsible for the monstrosity here

    Blue skies over bad lands

  3. #33
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    Grapeseed is my default when cooking. Peanut when frying or a blend. Have used Wesson when it was the only game in town. Someone recently left a lg bottle of avocado behind and I like it but probably won't replace it. Only use EVOO for low temp saute (base for sauces). I don't get the fishy smell so have no down side.
    Older and wider..

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Noodle Soup View Post
    I'm not saying it isn't used but I've never found coconut oil common in Thai curries. Most places I've been in Asia, Thailand, China, Viet Nam, like to use corn or soybean oil because its cheap. And cheap tends to rule the day.
    I like to use it when cracking the cream for frying the paste. I feel it gives a head start over just cracking pure cream. Cracking pure cream yields coconut oil in any case, and this technique is very traditional in Thailand. I guess cheap doesn't rule my day. Put another way, I don't feel that a heaping tablespoon of coconut oil puts much of a financial damper on a meal for a few people. Funnily enough, I drenched some brussels sprouts and stringed russets in warm coconut oil and baked them the other night in a CI skillet. Really pumped in the umami and my 3yo hoovered the sprouts, which I think she'd not have otherwise!

  5. #35
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    Is the elusive "light olive oil" actually ever found on shelves in the US, or would they rather sell you anything that ain't biodiesel as extra virgin?

  6. #36
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    Exclamation

    Virgin olive oil is the best)

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by woyuskinny View Post
    I like to use it when cracking the cream for frying the paste. I feel it gives a head start over just cracking pure cream. Cracking pure cream yields coconut oil in any case, and this technique is very traditional in Thailand. I guess cheap doesn't rule my day. Put another way, I don't feel that a heaping tablespoon of coconut oil puts much of a financial damper on a meal for a few people. Funnily enough, I drenched some brussels sprouts and stringed russets in warm coconut oil and baked them the other night in a CI skillet. Really pumped in the umami and my 3yo hoovered the sprouts, which I think she'd not have otherwise!
    I've certainly used coconut cream rendered to oil that way but basic stir fry oil used in the same dish was always something else.

  8. #38
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    @Anim not for all cuisines and purposes.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by LifeByA1000Cuts View Post
    Is the elusive "light olive oil" actually ever found on shelves in the US, or would they rather sell you anything that ain't biodiesel as extra virgin?
    That's a good question. Even the cheapest, crappiest olive oils here are usually labelled "extra virgin." Makes one wonder where all the 2nd and 3rd pressings of the olive oil go. We've long known that olive oil fraud is rampant, but it's hard to imagine how it could be this rampant.

  10. #40
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    That all being the case about olive oils, I think you can buy a light olive oil for cooking based on the color / clarity and the price. If it's a light color and very clear, and inexpensive, it probably won't have a lot of flavor or too low a smoke point. So it will probably fine in spite of the inevitable "extra virgin" label.

    It's harder to buy high quality, flavorful olive oil, for raw dishes. The kind that SHOULD be labelled E.V.. You just don't know what you're getting anymore. It's easiest if you know some specialty shop that lets you taste them. In NYC Williams Sonoma used to have them set out on a bar, with pieces of bread (they stopped doing this ... I no longer have a reason to go into W.S.). If you can't taste the oil first, you have to trust other people's descriptions and take a gamble.


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