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Thread: Why are Yanagi's so thick

  1. #1

    Why are Yanagi's so thick

    Hi

    Another stupid question time.

    With the main purpose of a yanaigi being very fine slicing of fish why are they generally so much thicker in the blade than a gyuto ?

    Thanks

    Alan

  2. #2
    First of all depends on which gyuto you are going to take as reference.
    Second it also depends on which yanagiba you will take for reference.
    Example Shigefusa yanagis are thinner than usual, but their guto are on the thicker side, when you measure the spine, but IMO they both cut superbly well.
    Yanagiba has a construction such that it makes thin slices very easy to make, so evn though they look thick they get the job done.

  3. #3
    Weight. It makes it so blade heavy, it wants to do all the work for you. Just put it on the food, keep it straight and pull.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    Weight. It makes it so blade heavy, it wants to do all the work for you. Just put it on the food, keep it straight and pull.
    There are thin and thick yanagis, as there are thin and thick gyuto. In my experience, it is easier and takes less time to make a thicker knife.

    If you ask a person who uses a yanagi day in and day out, they are likely to go for a thinner knife. A friend of mine, who is a sushi chef, his preferred knife is a thin 270mm yanagi or a fuguhiki.

    M


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  5. #5
    i had been asked befor about amkig one in something liek 1/8 inch thick spine. maybe one of these days i ll give it a shot

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    Weight. It makes it so blade heavy, it wants to do all the work for you. Just put it on the food, keep it straight and pull.
    +1
    “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.”

  7. #7
    Senior Member Seb's Avatar
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    Isn't the thickness also to accommodate the hollow left-side?

  8. #8
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Seb, I think you're partly right. I'm no expert on yanagis, but isn't it also that the thickness and grind push the slices well away from the rest of the fish?
    09/06

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  9. #9
    Senior Member Seb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    Seb, I think you're partly right. I'm no expert on yanagis, but isn't it also that the thickness and grind push the slices well away from the rest of the fish?
    Yep.

    Because of the way the Yanagi is used to slice fish, for example, starting for a righty from the left-hand side, the hollow ('ura') allows the cut pieces to fall away without sticking to the blade.

    Another likely reason is that the thicker spine/upper part is needed to (1) support the very very thin lower part and also (2) to keep the blade straight during and after the forging process; nevertheless, you still see complaints on the forums every now and then from members who received bent or twisted yanagis.

    Of course, there is more than one way of making a yanagi; for instance, the Honyaki and Kasumi/Hon-gasumi methods.

  10. #10
    so long as you dont grin=d the face bevel under 15 degrees the edge will hold btu it will look funny since it will not travle upthe blade all that far

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