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  1. #1
    WillC's Avatar
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    3 More finished from my workshop.

    This is the little Petty and Nakiri I posted before, with some nicer handles I made. The previous ones were bought in and a bit small and light. I also updated the geometry a bit. Making a secondary bevel and micro bevel seems to do the job for ripe tomatoes.

    Petty
    Specifications
    Materials – 15n20 and plain carbon, (ave. 0.8%C) this is a high layer W’s pattern forged out so the W’s stretch out and unravel. I call it unravelled W’s.
    Blade length – 156mm
    Blade width – 31mm
    Blade Thickness – 1.8mm tapering to 1.2mm to 2/3rds of the spine, before tip taper.
    Handle length – 118mm
    Handle Materials – Maple Burl.
    Balance point – Finger on Choil.
    Grind – Full flat with approximately 7 degree per side secondary. Micro-bevel set at 11 degrees per side.
    Finish - Hand rubbed to 1200gt.









    Full Damascus Nakiri.
    Specifications
    Materials - 15n20 and plain carbon, (ave. 0.8%C) This is a high layer W’s pattern forged out so the W’s stretch out and unravel. I call it unravelled W’s.
    Blade Length – 115mm
    Blade Width - 49mm
    Blade thickness – 1mm
    Handle Length – 115mm
    Handle Materials – Maple Burl
    Balance point – 10mm in front of Choil
    Grind – Sabre grind to halfway up blade, blended. Approximately 7 degree per side secondary. Micro-bevel set at 11 degrees per side.
    Finish - Hand rubbed to 1200gt.






    Lastly a cute little Damascus Utility, I did this to get a look at a 4 bar W's pattern billet I made. Not quite what I expected to see, the w's are a bit small, but I like it



    Small Damascus Utility.
    Materials - 15n20 and plain carbon, (ave. 0.8%C). The pattern is a high layer W’s pattern twisted and stacked to make a 4 bar pattern.
    Blade Length – 84mm
    Blade Width – 42mm
    Blade thickness – 1.5mm at back tapering all the way from there.
    Handle Length – 92mm
    Handle Materials – Amboyna Burl
    Balance point – Finger on choil.
    Grind – Full flat with approximately 7 degree per side secondary. Micro-bevel set at 11 degrees per side.
    Finish - Hand rubbed to 1200gt.










    Lastly a group shot.



    Next time I promise to show some WIP, maybe some pattern development if anyones interested. Taking an etch of the end of the bar every now and then helps me anyway. Not sure what patterns I'll do next yet. I'm enjoying playing with W's at the moment and am not quite seeing what I want to see at the moment, so I shall persist.
    Of course all feedback and thoughts gratefully received.

  2. #2

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    Very nice, Will. I have been told (and actually experienced this once) that when you are doing the initial "crushes" to make W's, if you square the sides of the billet too much, you can end up undoing the W's.

  3. #3
    WillC's Avatar
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    Cheers Joe. Not sure there lost, just too small, like nearly too small to see at all, If you look into the little rivers of movement. Thats my W's I think I got carried away on stacking, for a 30 layer start. Thinking about it the billet was rounded for the twist. Then the stack to 4 for 4 bar made them super small. The larger swirls are just straight layers I added in the final W's stack before forging down and twisting. This is the end of the billet so there is not much twist going on in the top bars.

  4. #4

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    Unfortunately, the best way to expose W's seems to be twisting and cutting into the billets, laddering or accordion/tile cutting, all of which end up either wasting 40-60% of your billet or all of it if you mess up the welding of the tiles. But they sure look good when you are done. I have heard guys refer to that stetched out pattern like yours as "seaweed" pattern/ John Perry built an entire folder, blade, bolsters, frames, etc, out of a very bold, high contrast version of that type of pattern a couple of years ago. Bill Buxton made s pair of knives recently with something similar.
    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbybrocks View Post
    Cheers Joe. Not sure there lost, just too small, like nearly too small to see at all, If you look into the little rivers of movement. Thats my W's

  5. #5
    WillC's Avatar
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    I know what you mean, and I guess this would be seaweed twisted with W's. As the seaweed would be on the sides, (or the top if you forged it out the wrong way). I learnt that on my feathered seaweed I really think you can get good W's using this method, but the start layers and compression had to be spot on. Just look at Toby's lovely feather patterns he has done without cutting the thing up. There is more movement and randomness to it than a tiled pattern but that to me makes the pattern.

  6. #6
    Senior Member goodchef1's Avatar
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    really nice work. I was looking at those layers, and got back to my previous lust for a fine layered steel that looks like grind marks/lines that go the entire length of the blade, that are ridiculously straight and even throughout the whole blade. I don't know if that is even possible.

  7. #7
    WillC's Avatar
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    Thanks, yeah I think it would be if you did a high layer straight laminate and managed to keep it dead straight. Not an easy thing to do mind. The top 2 blades of mine look quite like a straight laminate. But its actually a w's pattern forged out with the w's going with the length of the blade rather than across the blade. So the layers are stood on end rather than running flat. Of course the w's get stretched out and you loose the W effect but I got left with some cool movement in a fine pattern. Quite smokey. These things are hard to explain but easy to show with a quick etch after each process.

  8. #8

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    Normally, I would think that the only way you could get a dead straight pattern like that would be if you had a BIG press that would take bites on an entire billet or if you did all of your forge welding on a rolling mill. Even then you would probably have to figure a way to keep everything nice and flat all the way though the forge welding process and stock remove from flat stock as opposed to forging to shape to get that kind of effect.

  9. #9
    These designs(especially the Nakiri) are not for me at all.

    But you are a fantastic finisher! These things are cleaned up like jewelry, and it communicates complete precision. Like super-attractive women that are not my type.

  10. #10
    Cool, though I would have to agree with JohnDoughy on the design. I think a safer road would be to use a tried-and-true design as a starting point and modify to your liking but preserving all important pats like profile, grind, etc.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

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