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straight razor users... What makes for a great strop ? - Page 2
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Thread: straight razor users... What makes for a great strop ?

  1. #11
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    But nowhere near as much fun!
    i don't know, i really like my beard.

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    A man without a beard looks naked at best, effete in fact . . .

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    Senior Member DwarvenChef's Avatar
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    Something about starting the day with a leathal weapon at your throat just really puts the rest of the day in perspective

    I used to hate shaving, now I rather enjoy it.

  4. #14

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    i have a horse bench strop with CrOx but only use it inbetween stones and for cleaning up before finish strop on hanging bridal leather that HA made for me years ago(or my classic shaving duel strop)
    im sure i coudl get a slighly better edge (i want to get a 20k G from a certan vender on here ) but all my razors ship with a shave ready edge (some ppl liek a edge a bit more sharp and some liek one a bit more forgiving so i shoot the middle)

    i dont use a canvas anymore and only now and then on the back of my classic strop (light dusting of crox ) jsut good stones and clean leather 90% of the time

  5. #15
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    How still / thick is a good strop and what's the best length?

  6. #16
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    Colin do you go for straight razors now ?

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxim View Post
    Colin do you go for straight razors now ?
    No no no don't get any ideas in your head. I love to do leather work and I'm wanting to make a very nice barber strop. I have just never seen or used one so I'm trying to get info.

  8. #18
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    I don't know which vendor you are referring to but shell cordovan was once very common in high end strops yes it is thin but it is very strong and has a wonderful draw to it. Now it gets confusing because cordovan also refers to a leather treatment which is not shell (which is actually not hide but a thick calous like membrane on a horses rear). The thickness is not of the utmost importance I have heard of some making strops from kangaroo hide which is very thin. More important is the draw, an almost sticktion like force between the razor and the strop different draw will leave a different finish on different razors. I for one like alot of draw for my heavier wedge type razors and use a very slick horsehide strop with much less draw for my finer hollow razors. For dimensions I prefer a 3" by 24-28" strop although historically 2.5" was probably the most common with wider strops cupping becomes an issue as the edges will rise giving you problems. If your looking for examples Straightrazordesigns makes a beautiful strop for the money but the kanayama that JimR sells out of Japan is supposed to be in a league of it's own, for the price it should be. Heavy linen is the most historically correct backing material but the poly webbing put out by SRD is easy to use and effective. Felt is a great when used with compounds like diamond or CrOx. Hope this helps!

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by The hekler View Post
    I don't know which vendor you are referring to but shell cordovan was once very common in high end strops yes it is thin but it is very strong and has a wonderful draw to it. Now it gets confusing because cordovan also refers to a leather treatment which is not shell (which is actually not hide but a thick calous like membrane on a horses rear). The thickness is not of the utmost importance I have heard of some making strops from kangaroo hide which is very thin. More important is the draw, an almost sticktion like force between the razor and the strop different draw will leave a different finish on different razors. I for one like alot of draw for my heavier wedge type razors and use a very slick horsehide strop with much less draw for my finer hollow razors. For dimensions I prefer a 3" by 24-28" strop although historically 2.5" was probably the most common with wider strops cupping becomes an issue as the edges will rise giving you problems. If your looking for examples Straightrazordesigns makes a beautiful strop for the money but the kanayama that JimR sells out of Japan is supposed to be in a league of it's own, for the price it should be. Heavy linen is the most historically correct backing material but the poly webbing put out by SRD is easy to use and effective. Felt is a great when used with compounds like diamond or CrOx. Hope this helps!
    isn't shell and horsehide the same thing?

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mainaman View Post
    isn't shell and horsehide the same thing?
    Horsehide is just that the hide of a horse treated like leather... Actuall shell cordovan is not hide at all it is two oval shaped calluses under the skin of the horse on it's rump. Shell is most often used for high end shoes. It is not actually the hide which is a common misconception but a layer between hide and the flesh of the animal, it's use was much more common prior to the 20th century when horses were more common, for strop makers it has gotten to be prohibitively expensive to purchase in the length required for a strop >20" as the two "shells" found on a horse are often too small. Cordovan is also a treatment used on leather which is often confused with shell cordovan often intentionally to increase price. At least this is what I have found to be the case in my research which was certainly not exhaustive but was fairly thorough. I knew of at least one company still using shell but that was almost a year ago an I do not know if they are still operation. But I think there is only one company in the US making shell cordovan and they clearly mark each piece as such.

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