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Thread: Gyuto vs Deba

  1. #1
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    Gyuto vs Deba

    Are Debas that much stronger than Gyutos? And if I were to get a Deba would it be better than getting a western knife such as a wusthof?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Citizen Snips's Avatar
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    what are you looking to do with it?

    deba is a fish butchering knife, not an all purpose knife such as your chef's knife or a gyuto

    also, what do you mean by stronger?

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    Chances are you don't want or need a deba unless you are a fish monger. A gyuto is a nice all around knife. If you want something thicker than most gyutos, you can get a "western" deba. Wusthof is a german name brand. They make a lot of serviceable knives, none of which perform particularly well in cutting tasks.

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    I think you mean a "western deba". A deba is a fish butchery tool, and looks like this:

    They are very thick and heavy.


    A western deba is this:

    They are much thicker and heavier than a regular gyuto/chef's, but are intended to be more well-rounded than a Deba.


    The question of "would it be better" is a philosophical one. A practical answer can only be obtained if you give us information about what you want! There is a questionnaire for just these kinds of situations:
    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...should-you-buy

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    I know gyutos are very thin and was wondering if the deba is a more durable "workhorse" kind of a knife. I am looking at the western deba from Hattori.

    Here is the link, the knife is about half way down the page.


    http://japanesechefsknife.com/Hattor...efsKnives.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by bechler View Post
    I know gyutos are very thin and was wondering if the deba is a more durable "workhorse" kind of a knife. I am looking at the western deba from Hattori.
    One of the fundamental things that creates the difference(read:superiority) of mass-produced Japanese cutlery over mass-produced American and German cutlery is the understanding that if you use good steel and treat it well, you don't have to have something the size of an axe to withstand the rigors of a kitchen, and thinner knives cut more efficiently. The light and thinness of J-blades is not in any way a weakness, but instead it is a sign that they can do anything Wusthof can do better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    One of the fundamental things that creates the difference(read:superiority) of mass-produced Japanese cutlery over mass-produced American and German cutlery is the understanding that if you use good steel and treat it well, you don't have to have something the size of an axe to withstand the rigors of a kitchen, and thinner knives cut more efficiently. The light and thinness of J-blades is not in any way a weakness, but instead it is a sign that they can do anything Wusthof can do better.
    Yes and no. Wusthofs are designed to withstand prolonged contact with water without rusting, being battered around like a hammer (sorta) without chipping, and being steeled repeatedly for the sharpening-incompetent consumer in mind. If you do not need these things, the Wusthof has nothing for you. If you do, well then that's your kind of knife.

  8. #8

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    Let's also point out that not all gyutos are thin razor blades. There are some thicker ones that will hold up just as well as a wustof or western deba, but cut much better than either. Tojiro DP? What is your budget?
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    Yes and no. Wusthofs are designed to withstand prolonged contact with water without rusting, being battered around like a hammer (sorta) without chipping, and being steeled repeatedly for the sharpening-incompetent consumer in mind. If you do not need these things, the Wusthof has nothing for you. If you do, well then that's your kind of knife.
    I've seen more than a few wusthofs that have rust spots on them from dishwashers, and more than a few quality j-blades that can be seriously abused without chipping, and any knife can withstand proper steeling for a long time, and nothing(not even a wusthof) can survive gordon-ramsay-style abuse.

    I've always had an open mind about knife types, and have always given every brand the benefit of the doubt. I also go to great lengths to discover what people like in popular things. What I've learned about german knives(Henckels and Wusthof's best selling lines in perticular), is that people like them because they don't know any better and want to like their knives bad enough that they pick something and love it. They offer nothing. They cut like crap, don't last, aren't even advertised in store as PERMANENT PURCHASES, are ergonomically incorrect, look like barf, are inconsistent, etc etc. I've yet to figure out what is good about them. They can't withstand abuse or mistreatment, they aren't designed to fit the use style of casual cooks, and they aren't made to last.

    They are a marketing gimmick, IMO. Made to hit a cost point and sell at a certain price. There are many I've met in the past year that do ALL their kitchen cutting with scissors. All those Wal-Mart/Bed Bath & Beyond/Target brands do for you is lighten your wallet and cut about as good as any other flattish object.

    *edit* I should add that this wasn't just a rant off the wall, it was intended for the benefit of the poster.

  10. #10
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    I think there are some heavier or "mightier" gyutos that one should consider before diving into a western deba as an all arounder....

    A traditional deba is used literally to split; the edge cutting the flesh, the hefty wedge blade splitting behind. Not very conducive for normal veggie prep....
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
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