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Thread: Knifemakers...Thoughts on a shop

  1. #21
    And i might add, that with some of the crafty folks around here you can have a few things made also. For instance, you can get a quench take made from some 6" round pipe(Vertical) or i have a friend that made mine, it is a 10 gallon horizontal, for about $70. After being at Randy's.....I would like to think that a surface grinder would be a DEFINITE love to have item...

  2. #22
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    Woah.

    My brother in-law is a custom furniture maker. If the timing is right he might move his shop into the building. That wood be nice. I could eliminate anything having to do with handles. And quite frankly I would prefer he do the handles. He's quite gifted. He has some serious tools. Right now he's customizing a corporate jet.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Salty dog View Post
    Woah.

    My brother in-law is a custom furniture maker. If the timing is right he might move his shop into the building. That wood be nice. I could eliminate anything having to do with handles. And quite frankly I would prefer he do the handles. He's quite gifted. He has some serious tools. Right now he's customizing a corporate jet.
    Sounds like a great person to keep around

  4. #24

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    $15K will get you set up nicely if that doesn't include the cost of the building. if you are going to play around with the whole metal pounding thing, i would think seriously about getting either something like a rebuilt 50 lb Little Giant, the small 33 lb Anyang air hammer or one of the presses like a Claiborne. The 25 lb Little Giant is nice, but most guys who own LG's say that if you can only afford one of the smaller hammers, get the 50 lb. Del's list is a good one, but if you buy the horzontal/verticle bandsaw, the shop saw might be redundant. The typical abrasive saw works fine for chopping up say 1/4 inch stock, but it ain't worth a damn for cutting up thicker things like damascus billets IMO once you use the wheel a little bit. It gets glazed up and cuts slow and ragged.

  5. #25
    i have a KMG (2hp and i woudl like another )
    mini mill (no its not much of a reall mill but it does most any knife maker size milling job and it drills hols too)
    wood saw 12 inck
    roll n saw (its a must have now that i have it )
    even heat 18 (wish for a 24 -36 sized one tho )
    LN dewer and quench oils / Al plates and 12 ton HF press (most of my HT stuffs right there)
    13 inch southbend lathe(not running ) looking for a 9 inch as its more useful in knife making

    now then a few of those tools are cheap when you get them (lathe and mill ) but till you get the tooling to make them doo everything you want you can spend some reall cash

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by l r harner View Post
    ...

    now then a few of those tools are cheap when you get them (lathe and mill ) but till you get the tooling to make them doo everything you want you can spend some reall cash
    True that plus factor a possible repair cost. My landlord just had his 100-year-old stair trencher (machine for making groves for stairs) fixed. It cost him $2500 in repairs, mostly travel time, daily rate and some labor (not much actually) of the mechanic. Unless you have a good mechanic in the vicinity who can maintain and fix old metal-working machines cheaply, buying them in good working order is a must. I am talking about machines like a metal lathe, a surface grinder or a mill.

    M


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  7. #27
    well with mills and lathes less the bed/ gibs or bearings are shot they are hard to kill (they can get a bit sloppy tho ) and sloppy is to a tool and die maker (we are not needed to be that picky)
    i am keeping my eye open for a surface grinder but really i dont need one more then once or twice a year for most of my work i would rater spen $ on a larger mill and a smaller lathe and a Ti anodizer (kind of getting into that folder thing)

  8. #28

    Shop

    I think the KMG grinder is the best mid priced grinder and you will want it with VFD (Speed control) Beaumont metal works. 2hp. You may also want a 9" disc grinder. You will need a slow drill press. Many knifemakers hunt for best prices and buy VFD's and motors on ebay. Measuring devices, sand paper, carbide scorer for center line making an edge, grinding belts.

    At this point you can make great blades, $3000-$4000 later depending on whether you looked for great deals.

    Before you get into heat treat and damascus you can find if making knives is for you. Heat treat is economical from Peter's heat treat if you send in 10-20 lbs of steel at a time. And they can do a great job.

    Now you need $1000+ or so for steel maybe 01, 52100, aeb-l or ? and $500+ for handle materials. You are ready to go.

    Most knifemakers use NJSTEELBARON for steel, call for things not listed.

    Forging and damascus will make beautiful knives but they will not perform better than o1 flat ground tool steel. Good luck.

    David

  9. #29
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    You don't say?

  10. #30

    I do say

    Hi Salty, I am not sure if I you are surprised by my comments or don't believe them. I noticed it was only my first post so I would double check with people you trust. Oh and get a Dewalt portaband saw and table mount.

    I have really loved reading your reviews, blogs, you tube etc on kitchen knives.

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