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Sharpening for pro-kitchen use
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Thread: Sharpening for pro-kitchen use

  1. #1

    Sharpening for pro-kitchen use

    I about to invest in 3-4 stones. I cut a lot of veggies and protein.

    I'm not looking for a 30.000 grit finish, I need good working edges that will last as long as possible.

    I have ordered a gyoto in 52100 steel. If someone has sharpening experience with this steeltype - they would share - I'd appreciate it

  2. #2
    I would recommend you get a 220, 1k, 5k and 10k.

    You can do
    A.- A compound edge, that is leave the heel of the knife with a 220 grit edge to cut into proteins and tuff skin or whatever, and polish the rest of the edge for veg.
    B.- take a 220 and polish on the 10k see if you like that edge and if it works for you. If not take the 1k and polish with the 10k repeat until desired results are achieved. You can then proceed to either polish the rest of the knife and leave the heel with the current edge or leave it as is.

    For me, I would sharpen the knife daily depending what I new I had to do, and the best combo was leaving a 1k polished heel and a full progression on the rest. No edge that I know of cuts as good as a 10k and lasts as long as a 220, so you might need to experiment a bit to your taste.

  3. #3
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    Really, it depends on many factors: what are you cutting, how you cut it, what you are cutting on, etc. Finer edges are better but lose toothiness quicker. 52100 can hold on to that toothiness quite a while depending on who made it. I'd go for a ~500, 1k, 5k and a strop loaded with something in the 1-3 micron range. Don't spend too much time on the 1k and beyond. A fine edge can also work if you have something around that will reestablish a little toothiness during your shift (rod, stone, strop), in case you need it. If you have enough length, I like Memo's suggestions with regard to putting several types of edges along the length of your blade (finer, thinner edges toward the tip).

  4. #4
    Senior Member Citizen Snips's Avatar
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    great points here.

    i would not suggest going that low with the 220 advice but something more like a 500. i personally prefer only 2 stones and currently they are 400 and 4k but could easily be 500 and 5k.

    my suggestion would be to start with only two stones, and probably go with like 500 and 2k. on top of those pick up a felt strop and CRO2 to load it. try the 2k edge and if it is toothy enough, just stop there but if you like the feeling of that really sharp edge that you will get to try from the strop, pick up another finisher in the 5k+ range.

    as a professional i prefer the two stone setup as of lately. refining an edge that much just doesn't work out well for me in the heavy prep world. it feels like it gets dull quicker and it feels like it slides when cutting certain things. i go 400 and then 4k. i can cut various vegetable and i get the toothy feeling i desire and it can also shave my arm hair. this is the perfect edge for me in the kitchen.

    i only say this because there is no reason to buy a bunch of stones and find out you dont use half of them after a few months of practice. start slow and then if you decide to pick up more stones, you will have plenty of great advice from everyone here on where to go next.

    good luck with your purchases

  5. #5
    Great advise guys thanks. Can you recommend any brands you think I should look at?

  6. #6
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    If you like soakers and you're on a budget, you really can't beat the beston, bester, rika trio. My favorites have to be the Gesshin soaker line. The set-up I use is out of convenience but I also like it a lot: Gesshin 400 (sometimes), 1k, 5k and 8kSS plus a little stropping. Again, I don't spend too much time above the 1k or the bite will go pretty quickly.

  7. #7
    Not really on a budget - I want stones of great quality, be a joy to use, and will last a good amount of time.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    As you live in Denmark you may get Choseras at a very good price with edenwebshops.de or .co.uk. Within the EU you don't pay import duties.

  9. #9
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    I just realized you're in Denmark. Bummer. The Gesshins would be prohibitively expensive but if you like soakers, Gesshin 500, 2k, 4k are really nice. I might even skip the 2k if you like toothy. The 4k is pretty fast. I'd probably still finish on an 8k SS though. I just love that stone. Another option is to get a combo Belgian coticule and a Gesshin 400. I love the coticule, too. That reminds me, I need to buy another one.

    Choseras are nice, too but mine don't get a whole lot of use.

  10. #10
    Thanks Ben ...

    tk59 ... US is no issue, I got half of my family there who can ship stuff to me

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