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Thread: Files for wood

  1. #1
    Senior Member Kingkor's Avatar
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    Files for wood

    I have a question for all the makers/diy guys around here. What files do you use for woodworking and why?
    (if possible links would be appreciated)


  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    I'm not a woodworker, but I love these needle rasps for enlarging tang holes to fit a blade to a handle. I've used a few different brands, and these are really nice without being absurdly expensive.

    https://www.woodcraft.com/products/n...p-set-w-handle


  3. #3
    ant_topps's Avatar
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    I have a number of files for shaping handles. Especially the harder / denser woods.
    Oily woods like African Blackwood can really clog your belts if you use your grinder, so the files really are a viable option.

    I have some cheap files but they have stood up to the tasks so far:
    Half round and Round Rasp - for roughing in your contours ad removing wood quickly
    Flat, Half round and Round 1st / 2nd cut - refining and removing deep gouges.

    Keep a wire brush on hand as well to clear out the teeth while you work.

  4. #4
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
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    2 areas for widening...

    Most opening for gyutos... width is abt 2 to 4mm and tang height can vary between 11 to 13mm

    a)to increase the height .. I wld always try to adjust the lower part as this portion slopes towards.. meaning I do not hv to go all the way back .. I hv used a drill bit.. slightly angled to increase the height.. IF the width is 2mm as in some gyutos.. got to be extra careful

    b) For the sides..

    For Debas.. the Width is abt 11mm and you need a wider file or rasp. and depending on the bit size you use.. I prefer 8mm drill bit for the . and thus the needle files wld take too much time... I need wider files .

    Next is to try adn use a Jig saw as I saw that some narrow blades are available

    Also Toying with the idea of just using a scroll saw just for the ferule portion... now where to borrow one to check it out???

    hv fun...
    d

  5. #5
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    In addition to the suggestions above I recommend a set of diamond files. I bought a cheap 6 piece set on amazon and they have held up very well over several years of use. They are useful for eliminating scratch marks in tough spots on metal, widening tang slots in handles and cleaning up parts of the choil and other little things. They are useful because they work well on hardened steel.

    https://www.amazon.com/SE-74330DF-6-...=diamond+files

  6. #6
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    I haven't tried knife handles yet, but I have done quite a lot of furniture and ornamental carving. My favorite are Nicholson #49 and #50. A warning though, they moved their production to Brazil a while back and the quality took a dive. If you want the real thing you'll need to find the older versions.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Castalia's Avatar
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    Depends how much wood you want to remove, but Lie Nielsen has some good quality stuff

  8. #8
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    Used to do everything with a file but a rasp is some 20x faster so get one of those right away. Files dont dull much on wood so a cheap one is just as fine as expensive one imo. Bad experience with skandia (dull out of package). Bahco is good but a bit on the fine side. Have some super cheap housebrand stuff. It is usually a bit courser/rougher than the brandname stuff but works just as well.

  9. #9
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    For me it depends on the project. If it's for aggressive shaping handcut pattern makers rasps are great. They come in medium and finer grits and they work fast without sacrificing quality. They can be expensive but they outperform most options I've tried.

    For cleaning up a handle hole, or simple refinements, my choices would change. This applies to whether the tool is flat or half round.

    For working curves, as simple as it is - I'll also go super simple and stick some coarse sandpaper on to a strip of wood that I can bend like a bow as I cut with it.


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