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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    From teaching classes it's become clear to me that there's no right or wrong way for someone to start off with and that people should try it all before making a commitment on whatever being their style. In the end you'll probably wind up doing something in between this and that and be OK with what results you're getting.

    The key to getting goods results from whatever technique being used is to take it S-L-O-W and frequently look at your work and analyse what you're doing and make changes as needed.
    That's exactly what I just did .... slow .... look .... slow .... look. Worked out pretty well - for a beginner

  2. #22

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    I use all of them, depends on what I am doing, what I am doing it with, and what I am doing it to.

    Any method is fine, the main focus should be on understanding what is really happening when you sharpen. I know simple-thinkers and old shop-folk prefer the shamanistic approach of "do this this way or else" or "whatever works for you", but I believe it is a simple subject and anyone who wants to sharpen should learn the machanics of how it works.

  3. #23
    Dave Martell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    ....but I believe it is a simple subject and anyone who wants to sharpen should learn the machanics of how it works.

    Good point.

  4. #24
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    I think when I first started I used more aggressive pressure. Now I start with moderate, as I think you should start at an appropriate grit, and work your way up, letting the stones do the work. (unless you're getting rid of a chip or doing some serious bevel modification)

    I think too much pressure can lead to wobble....

    I do lighten up with each progression, ending with feather-light back/ stropping strokes.
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
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  5. #25

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    What I found out is that light pressure make me FEEL a lot more. It also gives a nice steady flow which I can control way better than when I press too hard.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    I begin with 5lbs pressure when starting on a 400 and lighten up with each step.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    +1
    +2

    BTW, TK, I broke down and ordered one of those 20x loupes.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by NO ChoP! View Post
    I think when I first started I used more aggressive pressure. Now I start with moderate, as I think you should start at an appropriate grit, and work your way up, letting the stones do the work. (unless you're getting rid of a chip or doing some serious bevel modification)

    I think too much pressure can lead to wobble....




    I do lighten up with each progression, ending with feather-light back/ stropping strokes.
    This is a good point, let the stone do the work. The point about better feel with less pressure is good as well.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
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  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Salty dog View Post
    +2

    BTW, TK, I broke down and ordered one of those 20x loupes.
    Uh oh, slippery slope. You know what that means. Next is the microscope.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  10. #30
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    No way. However I find myself wanting to see it closer. (Never say never)

    The thing that's interesting to me is observing the edge after working with certain foods over a certain period of time. Then combine that with how it feels at the time. You can get a pretty good idea of the characteristics of the steel.

    In the past I didn't have the time nor inclination to "study" my edges. I just got down to business. I must be getting old.

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