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  1. #1

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    Preferred sharpening method ...

    Been looking at quite a lot of sharpening vids. Many sharpen their knifes in sections - seems to be the most used. C-Dawg did a few videos where he used a different technique = long strokes covering the whole edge.

    Which method do you use? What is the pro's and cons of your method?

  2. #2
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    Long strokes covering the whole edge, switching hands as I switch sides of the knife. My swarf builds up (and my stones wear out) in an "X" shape.

  3. #3
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    i do sectional and sweeping, depending on how i'm feeling it, though most of the time i do the patented Jon Broida sweeping sections (or is it sectional sweeping?). i do sweeping most often when finishing. i don't switch hands, and find myself sweeping more on one side than the other, simply due to my own particular dexterity requirements. as long as you keep your angles and pressure consistent, abrasion is abrasion. knives and stones are different, so different methods feel best, even when you are trying to do the same thing each time.

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    Senior Member DwarvenChef's Avatar
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    Curtis sure has a way with the long sweaping motions and that worked for him, I picked up a little from his style as well as from others i have watched and tried. And that is the trick, trying as many styles you can find and see what they do for you. Each person has there own way of sharpening by hand. By experimenting you see what works and doesn't work for you. Hand sharpening can be seen as an art form because there is no one RIGHT way of doing it.

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    Sweeping looks really cool, but it takes a huge amount of skill to do it right. As Curtis notes in his video, you have to pay special attention to heel and tip, since they're on the stone a lot less compared to the middle of the blade when using this method. I sometimes do it to finish a blade, but it's mostly sectioning for me.

  6. #6
    Senior Member chefofthefuture's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wsfarrell View Post
    you have to pay special attention to heel and tip, since they're on the stone a lot less compared to the middle of the blade when using this method.
    +1

    Jon has a way of getting around this by picking up the blade slightly at the tip. For me personally I find going slowly over the edge yields better results then quickly flying back and forth over the stones.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by wsfarrell View Post
    Sweeping looks really cool, but it takes a huge amount of skill to do it right.
    Interesting. For me, the sweeps were really easy and intuitive, but sectioning was a massive pain that I just didn't have the skills to master. It was like night and day: I had months of terrible results doing it in sections like the videos said, and the first time I tried to emulate C-Dawgs technique I got the best edge I'd had.

    I think it just depends on which is easier for you: maintaining angle and pressure over distance, our replicating angle and pressure between sections. I had a much harder time repositioning the knife to a new section and recreating the exact same angle and pressure than I had keeping consistent angle and pressure down the knife's length.

    Now that I'm a "not terrible" sharpener (*COUGH*), either way works.

  8. #8
    Senior Member mpukas's Avatar
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    I've settled into using the full blade sweeps ala C-Dawg while using J-Bro's principals of traditional sectional sharpening, especially for the tip. I switch hands and keep the stone perpendicular to me. And I also use a count-down of strokes on each side. I used to start w/ 20-15-12-10 down to 1 for 1k, 4k & 8k stones. May not be over kill for a new knife, but now I find starting w/ 10-9- down to 1 is still more than enough.

    One interesting thing I've discovered (and why I'm particularly glad this thread was started!) is that on a couple of the knives that I have w/ a long flat section - Moritaka 270 kiri-gyuto and Yusuke 300 suji (which I sharpen 99/1 for righty) - I get holes in the edge. I try very hard to keep even pressure along the entire stroke forward and back, and on each side, but I still end up w/ a hole in a particular spot. Not sure it's a grind issue; can't see any over grinding w/ my naked eye or w/ a straight-edge, so I'm not gonna blame that. I usually have to take extra care and grind each side of that spot out sectionally, but as soon as I make a couple of sweeping strokes, it's back again. Haven't noticed any problems on any of my other gyuto's though. Any thoughts anyone? Cheers! mpp

  9. #9
    Senior Member Citizen Snips's Avatar
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    im kinda the opposite of all you guys. i posted some vids of sharpening when i learned how to use curtis' method but after some practice i was able to use the section style of sharpening using inspiration from jon, murray, and a few others that made sense. ill post my videos, and remember these are old but could possibly provide some inspiration to those that sweep.

    also, keep in mind that these were the first vids i made so they are kinda bad w/o a cameraman and the results are the second two. this is not how i sharpen now but these were some progression of how my sharpening grew. i think that sharpening the way that works best for you is very important.

    enjoy

    http://www.youtube.com/user/smoovism.../4/UujS-DNq7Ds
    http://www.youtube.com/user/smoovism.../3/5f6_rHPP2lk

    http://www.youtube.com/user/smoovism.../2/6EAb4dqFw_E
    http://www.youtube.com/user/smoovism.../1/1VM9uB9b0Rs
    It's like my ol' grandpappy used to say; "The less one makes declarative statements, the less apt he is to look a fool in retrospect"

  10. #10
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    I prefer sectional sharpening for one particular reason; I find the hand not holding the handle should always be applying pressure DIRECTLY over the stone. This is not possible with a full sweep, making for inconsistencies.

    I also don't like to switch up directions, being that I like my scratch pattern to be uniform.

    Jons angle approach does make great logical sense, as I have incorporated this as well...

    Again, I agree no particular way is better than another, as long as the angle and pressure are consistent, you're bound to get good results; it's about what works best for you; trial and error.
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

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