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Thread: Online Sharpening Tutorial Videos?

  1. #21
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    I do love how fanboy we all are about which youtube videos we learnt from.

    Though I will say Jons appear to me to be the best educational set on the web. Explains all thw concept as he goes and teaches in steps rather than just sharpening a knife and saying this is how its done.

    And if you get the chance take a class with him. It is next level learning... just be careful of he offers you a matcha latte... you won't sleep the same for days


  2. #22
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StonedEdge View Post
    Once again, take what works for you and ditch the rest.
    +1. That goes for ANY advice or guidance one may be looking for in life.


  3. #23
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    We'll this approach for beginners is going to make them frustrated quick. There are just too many variables to consider. We all learned our alphabet in one language before we spoke words.

    I would never suggest to a noob sharpener, hey go learn from joe, sam and harry and figure out for yourself what works best. Seems like good advise for insanity.

    I say, learn from one master first, then only after successfully practicing "waxing-on and waxing-off" and can execute the one footed flying Crane kick, should one attempt another sharpening style.
    One thing you can give and still keep...is your word.

  4. #24
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    For one, different knives and equipment require different sharpening styles right off the bat. Two, there is no single "correct" way of sharpening anything. Three, trial and error as well as repetition are the only way to learn any new physical skillset. Not disagreeing completely with you but to claim that studying some basic principles (the alphabet in your analogy) and then playing around with how you apply those principles in order to find methodologies that jive with your own personal mental/physical/intuitive composition and the equipment that is available to you leads to confusion and insanity, to me, doesn't add up......Of course, who am I to say that painting by numbers isn't the only way to create a worthwhile painting.

  5. #25
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    But see your statement there at the end is key...

    Paint by numbers isn't the only way to create a worthwhile painting. But is almost guarantees it if you follow the instructions.

    I think in the first instance Mucho is right. Doesn't have to be Jon's way, though i do think he provides the most comprehensive and easy to follow tutorials. But find one that works for you, it may take 2 or 3 "masters" or styles. And once you can consistently get a good edge then go looking for the things you can add or change to improve your results

  6. #26
    Senior Member nutmeg's Avatar
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    I learn many things with Youtube videos and think the people do the best as they can to transmit their knowledge.
    Professional sharpeners have the advantage of having to do it correctly in a short time if they want to keep their customers and earn money.

    Maybe I should search better but I believe the evaluation of an existing edge, concentration, consistency in angle and pressure are the key but not often shown.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Marek07's Avatar
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    Totally agree that evaluating the existing edge is essential yet often overlooked - especially on knives other than one's own. Guessing it's probably de rigueur for professional sharpeners.

  8. #28
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    my advise to anyone starting to sharpen is get an easy to sharpen knife(thinking Old Hickory paring or Hyde 4" square point), a Norton economy stone and some oil. No matter who you watch, the basics are the same. Mark the edge with a shapie, hold the blade at an angle, move blade across an abrasive surface, repeat for a number of times, examine the edge, repeat.

  9. #29
    Senior Member fatboylim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scott.livesey View Post
    my advise to anyone starting to sharpen is get an easy to sharpen knife(thinking Old Hickory paring or Hyde 4" square point), a Norton economy stone and some oil. No matter who you watch, the basics are the same. Mark the edge with a shapie, hold the blade at an angle, move blade across an abrasive surface, repeat for a number of times, examine the edge, repeat.
    +1 on easy to sharpen knives. I started sharpening on nakiri to avoid tip work early on. Now gyutos are little effort.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatboylim View Post
    +1 on easy to sharpen knives. I started sharpening on nakiri to avoid tip work early on. Now gyutos are little effort.
    my other point is how upset are you going to be if you put bad scratches or an uneven bevel on a $10 knife. best to learn the basics there then on you expensive gunaslicewe


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