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Are Jnats worth the price?
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Thread: Are Jnats worth the price?

  1. #1

    Are Jnats worth the price?

    Are the expensive japanese natural stones worth the price? I have zero experience/knowledge on them. I'm guessing they're expensive cause they're pretty rare and hard to acquire?

    But what else? what makes them reach prices that just never fails to surprise and amaze me?

    And also, if i have the money and buy a really expensive one... I just can't help but wonder how to explain to somebody, who has no idea what it is, why I bought a piece of rock for a 500 bucks? haha... kinda funny when I think about it...

  2. #2
    Senior Member

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    For producing a proper finish on a kasumi blade, there is no substitute. For monosteel knives, they are no better or worse than synthetic stones. For razors, they are invaluable.
    “Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”

  3. #3
    Try to compeer them to 30k Shapton then price seems reasonable
    Then add they thickness and size and how slow they were out.

  4. #4
    Senior Member rulesnut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by karloevaristo View Post
    I just can't help but wonder how to explain to somebody, who has no idea what it is, why I bought a piece of rock for a 500 bucks?
    Get your betrothed to explain to you why you need to spend mulitples of that on a tiny rock for her finger.

  5. #5
    I have bought a lot of JNAT stones in very different price ranges over the past few years. Main rule is that you get what you pay for. You can get very good quality stones for relatively little money by buying a smallish, ugly looking and irregularly shaped rock. There is, however, very slim chances to get a large stone of decent quality for little money. I have learnt that the hard way and I have a couple of very nice looking paper weights. Stick to people you trust and start small. Buy from vendors that accepts returns on expensive ($200+) stones. That way you can gain experience with JNATs and learn from your mistakes without having to sell your car. Also start with a softer stone on the fine grit side. Those rocks are by far the easiest to use and the most useful for your knives. If you are going to sharpen your straight razors you have to get a harder stone.

    From my perspective my best JNATs are worth every penny I paid for them, even if some of them are significantly above the price range you mention in your post. The "mistakes" are pretty much useless as sharpeners, but are luckily relatively low cost stones (sub $100) and as they are pretty they make great paper weights in my office.

    Good luck on your quest.

    DarKHOeK

  6. #6
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    Good question. I don't know. So far, I like my synthetics and naturals have been okay. If you sharpen all day, you want fast stones. That means synthetic. If you sharpen occasionally, you don't need your stone to last forever so that pretty much means synthetic. As for kasumi finishes, I've seen plenty of them done with something other than a natural stone. I still like the idea of using natural stones but I just haven't been blown away by anything yet other than Belgian coticule.

  7. #7
    Wow, I agree with everyone somehow

  8. #8
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    Good question. I don't know. So far, I like my synthetics and naturals have been okay. If you sharpen all day, you want fast stones. That means synthetic. If you sharpen occasionally, you don't need your stone to last forever so that pretty much means synthetic. As for kasumi finishes, I've seen plenty of them done with something other than a natural stone. I still like the idea of using natural stones but I just haven't been blown away by anything yet other than Belgian coticule.
    can you talk more about the Belgian coticule?

  9. #9
    My favorite finishing stone is a Narutaki tomae, here:



    It looks beautiful, smells good, has a great feel, and in a way connects me with sword polishers from centuries ago (I'm talking tradition, not skill). It's 6k-8k, cuts fast, makes a little mud, and is all the finisher I need for kitchen knives.

    I have synthetic stones that can do the same job, but this is usually the one I end up grabbing.

    Worth every penny.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    I just haven't been blown away by anything yet other than Belgian coticule.
    Strange... The first natural I got was a Belgian coticule combo stone, but I can't seem to find any use for it anymore after getting some nice JNATs. It is very efficient and good looking, but to me it just feels wrong compared to my Japanese rocks. Go figure. Belgian coticule combo stone anyone?

    DarKHOeK

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